Research reveals best method for emergency oxygen therapy on dogs [UQ News]

  • Panos LoukopoulosUniversity of Queensland

Press/Media: Press / Media

Description

Establishing the best technique for supplying oxygen to dogs in emergencies has earned a postgraduate university student an Australia-wide award.

A study by Panos Loukopoulos, published in the Australian Veterinary Practitioner, has been recognised by the Australian Small Animal Veterinary Association.

The study, part of Mr Loukopoulos' postgraduate diploma in veterinary clinical studies, involved the evaluation of four techniques to supply oxygen to dogs in emergency situations.

'The need for this study was based on the importance of oxygen therapy in every-day veterinary practice, and the relative lack of literature dealing with the comparative effectiveness of oxygen therapy methods,' Mr Loukopoulos said.

The methods studied were a face mask, an Elizabethan collar canopy, intranasal catheter and 'flow by' technique, involving an oxygen hose being held close to the dog's nose.

The dogs used in the examination were anaesthetised in each case and various flow rates of oxygen examined for every technique.

Mr Loukopoulos said two of the techniques, the Elizabethan collar canopy and the 'flow by' technique, were evaluated for the first time for use with emergency patients. The evaluation provided essential information in a critical field of practice.

'The results showed the face mask was more effective in elevating inspired oxygen concentration and that the Elizabethan collar canopy was also excellent for administering oxygen,' Mr Loukopoulos said.

'The Elizabethan collar canopy also was able to be used easily and without any complications, while the intranasal catheter, although similarly effective in elevating inspired oxygen, was often difficult to insert and had the potential for complications.'

The 'flow-by' technique proved marginally effective only when the hose was held as close to the nose as two centimetres and the technique was wasteful in comparison to the other three methods.

Mr Loukopoulos said the conclusions could potentially be adapted for cats in emergency cases in a veterinary clinic.

The study, undertaken with Dr William Reynolds, a former lecturer in veterinary clinical studies at the University, was completed while Mr Loukopoulos was studying on an Australian-European scholarship awarded by the Australian Vice-Chancellors' Committee.
Mr Loukopoulos, from Greece, is studying canine bone tumours for his PhD after receiving the Sister Janet Mylonas Memorial Scholarship from the University last year.

His studies are being supervised by Veterinary Pathobiology Division head Professor Wayne Robinson and Companion Animal Clinical Sciences Division head Associate Professor John Thornton.

Period20 Jan 1998

Media coverage

1

Media coverage

  • TitleResearch reveals best method for emergency oxygen therapy on dogs
    Degree of recognitionNational
    Media name/outletUQ News
    Media typeWeb
    CountryAustralia
    Date20/01/98
    DescriptionEstablishing the best technique for supplying oxygen to dogs in emergencies has earned a postgraduate university student an Australia-wide award.

    A study by Panos Loukopoulos, published in the Australian Veterinary Practitioner, has been recognised by the Australian Small Animal Veterinary Association.

    The study, part of Mr Loukopoulos' postgraduate diploma in veterinary clinical studies, involved the evaluation of four techniques to supply oxygen to dogs in emergency situations.

    'The need for this study was based on the importance of oxygen therapy in every-day veterinary practice, and the relative lack of literature dealing with the comparative effectiveness of oxygen therapy methods,' Mr Loukopoulos said.

    The methods studied were a face mask, an Elizabethan collar canopy, intranasal catheter and 'flow by' technique, involving an oxygen hose being held close to the dog's nose.

    The dogs used in the examination were anaesthetised in each case and various flow rates of oxygen examined for every technique.

    Mr Loukopoulos said two of the techniques, the Elizabethan collar canopy and the 'flow by' technique, were evaluated for the first time for use with emergency patients. The evaluation provided essential information in a critical field of practice.

    'The results showed the face mask was more effective in elevating inspired oxygen concentration and that the Elizabethan collar canopy was also excellent for administering oxygen,' Mr Loukopoulos said.

    'The Elizabethan collar canopy also was able to be used easily and without any complications, while the intranasal catheter, although similarly effective in elevating inspired oxygen, was often difficult to insert and had the potential for complications.'

    The 'flow-by' technique proved marginally effective only when the hose was held as close to the nose as two centimetres and the technique was wasteful in comparison to the other three methods.

    Mr Loukopoulos said the conclusions could potentially be adapted for cats in emergency cases in a veterinary clinic.

    The study, undertaken with Dr William Reynolds, a former lecturer in veterinary clinical studies at the University, was completed while Mr Loukopoulos was studying on an Australian-European scholarship awarded by the Australian Vice-Chancellors' Committee.
    Mr Loukopoulos, from Greece, is studying canine bone tumours for his PhD after receiving the Sister Janet Mylonas Memorial Scholarship from the University last year.

    His studies are being supervised by Veterinary Pathobiology Division head Professor Wayne Robinson and Companion Animal Clinical Sciences Division head Associate Professor John Thornton.
    Producer/AuthorThe University of Queensland
    URLhttps://www.uq.edu.au/news/article/1998/01/research-reveals-best-method-emergency-oxygen-therapy-dogs
    PersonsPanos Loukopoulos

Keywords

  • oxygen therapy