Cocaine, Death Squads and the War on Terror: US Imperialism and Class Struggle in Colombia

Impact: Cultural Impact, Social Impact, Public policy Impact, Environmental Impact

Impact story summary

In 2008, Oliver completed his PhD on the political economy of contemporary Colombia in the context of the cocaine drug trade, offering a radical critique of the ‘war on drugs’, the ‘war on terrorism’ and the global drug trade. Ten years of research culminated in his and Drew Cottle's 2011 book, 'Cocaine, Death Squads and the War on Terror: US Imperialism and Class Struggle in Colombia', published in the prestigious Monthly Review (Albert Einstein wrote its first lead article, 'Why Socialism?', in 1949). 'Cocaine, Death Squads and the War on Terror' details the complex nature of Colombian society and fostered recognition that the drug trade was a driver in global politics, and of the US's foreign policy with respect to drug-producing zones. 'Cocaine, Death Squads and the War on Terror' has impacted politics, culture and society, bringing the link between the global drug trade and the legitimate global economy to light. Following the book's release, it has been used by experts, journalists and community groups to critique the financial system, the war on drugs, the war on terror and US policy towards Colombia.
Impact date2011
Category of impactCultural Impact, Social Impact, Public policy Impact, Environmental Impact
Impact levelBenefit

Keywords

  • cocaine
  • commodity
  • capitalism
  • imperialism
  • Colombia
  • United States
  • war
  • terrorism
  • class struggle
  • death squads
  • political economy

Countries where impact occurred

  • Colombia
  • United States