A comparative investigation of Chinese and Australian managers' ethical beliefs and attitudes and their mutual perceptions of bribery

Robert J. Tuck

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

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Abstract

This study is a cross-cultural examination of Chinese and Australian business managers that chiefly concerns their beliefs, attitudes, perceptions and values about business ethics, with a special focus on bribery. The findings show that the sweeping negative stereotyping of China's business ethical practice as being corrupt, often proposed in the Western media, is unsubstantiated. The findings also indicate that many of the moral values of guanxi, face saving, trust, loyalty building, and family respect, especially for elders, have survived from Confucian times, and continue to resonate in the over 50s age group. There is also evidence that the same kind of ethical rationale that propelled Western business practice and institutions, such as the Golden Rule, when linked to the Confucian principle“the Silver Rule'“Do not do to others what you do not want done to yourself', remain in China. Much needs to take place to recapture some of the younger generation of Chinese managers' loyalty to the ethical principles of Neo- Confucianism, Mao Zedong Thought, or some other ethical principle to inculcate business confidence in Western managers. The practical implications from the study for Australian policy makers and agency executives doing business with the Chinese is that it can be complicated by bribery. Australian managers must respect differences in Chinese managers' gender, age, regional location and other factors that link organisational culture to changing corporate governance and business practice.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationDoctor of Business Administration
Awarding Institution
  • Charles Sturt University
Supervisors/Advisors
  • Ardagh, David, Principal Supervisor
  • Oczkowski, Edward, Co-Supervisor
Award date01 Feb 2009
Place of PublicationAustralia
Publisher
Publication statusPublished - 2009

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