A comparative study of adsorption of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) onto granular activated carbon, ion-exchange polymers and non-ion-exchange polymers

S. T.M.L.D. Senevirathna, S. Tanaka, S. Fujii, C. Kunacheva, H. Harada, B. R. Shivakoti, R. Okamoto

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83 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) is the latest chemical categorized as persistent organic pollutants (POPs). PFOS appears in the environmental water and tap water in ngL-1 level. The process of adsorption has been identified as an effective technique to eliminate PFOS in water. Three non-ion-exchange polymers (DowV493, DowL493 and AmbXAD4), two ion-exchange polymers (DowMarathonA and AmbIRA400) and one granular activated carbon (GAC) (Filtersorb400) were tested with regard to their sorption kinetics and isotherms at low PFOS concentrations (100-1000ngL-1 equilibrium concentrations). The sorption capacities at 1μgL-1 equilibrium concentration decreased in the following order: Ion-exchange polymers>non-ion-exchange polymers>GAC, but at further low equilibrium concentration (100ngL-1) non-ion-exchange polymers showed higher adsorption capacity than other adsorbents. In the case of sorption kinetics, GAC and ion-exchange polymers reached the equilibrium concentration within 4h and AmbXAD4 within 10h. DowV493 and DowL493 took more than 80h to reach equilibrium concentration. AmbIRA400 was identified as the best filter material to eliminate PFOS at equilibrium concentration>1000ngL-1. Considering both adsorption isotherms and adsorption kinetics, AmbXAD4 and DowMarathonA were recommended to eliminate PFOS at ngL-1 equilibrium concentration.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)647-651
Number of pages5
JournalChemosphere
Volume80
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01 Jul 2010
Externally publishedYes

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