A longitudinal investigation of reported learning styles of speech pathology students

Sharynne McLeod, Michelle Lincoln, Lindy McAllister, Diana Maloney, Alison Purcell, Patricia Eadie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

A longitudinal investigation of reported learning styles of three groups of speech pathology students was conducted using Honey and Mumford's Learning Styles Questionnaire (1986). The students reported that they were predominantly reflectors and activists. There were few who reported that they were theorists and pragmatists. These findings were consistent across the three groups of students and are consistent with research into the reported dominant learning styles of students in other health professions. Over the two-year period there were changes in the reported dominant learning styles of the students. Specifically, there was an increase in the number of students who reported they were activists. The ramifications for teaching and learning in speech pathology courses are discussed.
Original languageEnglish
JournalInternational Journal of Speech-Language Pathology
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1995

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