A mortality event associated with toxoplasmosis in macropods in rehabilitative care in Australia

Julien Grosmaire, Andrew Peters, Shane Raidal

Research output: Other contribution to conferencePoster

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Abstract

A mortality event of 19 wild macropod joeys in rehabilitative care over 3 months associated with toxoplasmosis is described. Clinical signs included dyspnoea, inappetence, lethargy or sudden death. 17 out of 19 joeys died within hours to days following onset of clinical signs while 2 joeys sustained severe rapid weight loss over a week before their death. Two juvenile eastern grey kangaroos were submitted for post-mortem at the Charles Sturt University Veterinary Diagnostics Laboratory where severe toxoplasmosis was diagnosed. The ten surviving cohabiting joeys were sampled for modified agglutination and immunofluorescent toxoplasma antibody testing. Toxoplasmosisis widely reported as a significant disease of captive native Australian marsupials due to its high morbidity and mortality. Marsupials are aberrant hosts of the protist apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii. Sporozoite ingestion leads to formation of rapidly dividing tachyzoite cysts or slowly replicating bradyzoite cysts in tissues, notably in the central nervous system,and accompanying inflammation typically results in significant neurological clinical signs. The only known definitive host of T. gondii are felids,and in Australia is Felis felis, the domestic cat. Sporulated oocyts shed by cats are highly resistant in the environment. Toxoplasmosis epizootics though reported, are scarce, this report reinforces the susceptibility of macropods to T. gondii and questions the methods of transmission in populations of marsupials.
Original languageEnglish
Pages41-41
Number of pages1
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2018
EventThe Joint Conference of the Asian Society of Conservation Medicine (ASCM) and the Wildlife Disease Association Australasia (WDAA) - Grand Inna Bali Beach Hotel, Bali, Indonesia
Duration: 28 Oct 201829 Oct 2018
http://2018bali.ascm-aszwm.org/

Conference

ConferenceThe Joint Conference of the Asian Society of Conservation Medicine (ASCM) and the Wildlife Disease Association Australasia (WDAA)
CountryIndonesia
CityBali
Period28/10/1829/10/18
Internet address

Fingerprint

Toxoplasmosis
Toxoplasma
Marsupialia
Felis
Mortality
Cysts
Cats
Macropodidae
Sporozoites
Lethargy
Agglutination
Sudden Death
Dyspnea
Weight Loss
Parasites
Central Nervous System
Eating
Inflammation
Morbidity
Antibodies

Cite this

Grosmaire, J., Peters, A., & Raidal, S. (2018). A mortality event associated with toxoplasmosis in macropods in rehabilitative care in Australia. 41-41. Poster session presented at The Joint Conference of the Asian Society of Conservation Medicine (ASCM) and the Wildlife Disease Association Australasia (WDAA), Bali, Indonesia.
Grosmaire, Julien ; Peters, Andrew ; Raidal, Shane. / A mortality event associated with toxoplasmosis in macropods in rehabilitative care in Australia. Poster session presented at The Joint Conference of the Asian Society of Conservation Medicine (ASCM) and the Wildlife Disease Association Australasia (WDAA), Bali, Indonesia.1 p.
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abstract = "A mortality event of 19 wild macropod joeys in rehabilitative care over 3 months associated with toxoplasmosis is described. Clinical signs included dyspnoea, inappetence, lethargy or sudden death. 17 out of 19 joeys died within hours to days following onset of clinical signs while 2 joeys sustained severe rapid weight loss over a week before their death. Two juvenile eastern grey kangaroos were submitted for post-mortem at the Charles Sturt University Veterinary Diagnostics Laboratory where severe toxoplasmosis was diagnosed. The ten surviving cohabiting joeys were sampled for modified agglutination and immunofluorescent toxoplasma antibody testing. Toxoplasmosisis widely reported as a significant disease of captive native Australian marsupials due to its high morbidity and mortality. Marsupials are aberrant hosts of the protist apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii. Sporozoite ingestion leads to formation of rapidly dividing tachyzoite cysts or slowly replicating bradyzoite cysts in tissues, notably in the central nervous system,and accompanying inflammation typically results in significant neurological clinical signs. The only known definitive host of T. gondii are felids,and in Australia is Felis felis, the domestic cat. Sporulated oocyts shed by cats are highly resistant in the environment. Toxoplasmosis epizootics though reported, are scarce, this report reinforces the susceptibility of macropods to T. gondii and questions the methods of transmission in populations of marsupials.",
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Grosmaire, J, Peters, A & Raidal, S 2018, 'A mortality event associated with toxoplasmosis in macropods in rehabilitative care in Australia' The Joint Conference of the Asian Society of Conservation Medicine (ASCM) and the Wildlife Disease Association Australasia (WDAA), Bali, Indonesia, 28/10/18 - 29/10/18, pp. 41-41.

A mortality event associated with toxoplasmosis in macropods in rehabilitative care in Australia. / Grosmaire, Julien; Peters, Andrew; Raidal, Shane.

2018. 41-41 Poster session presented at The Joint Conference of the Asian Society of Conservation Medicine (ASCM) and the Wildlife Disease Association Australasia (WDAA), Bali, Indonesia.

Research output: Other contribution to conferencePoster

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Grosmaire J, Peters A, Raidal S. A mortality event associated with toxoplasmosis in macropods in rehabilitative care in Australia. 2018. Poster session presented at The Joint Conference of the Asian Society of Conservation Medicine (ASCM) and the Wildlife Disease Association Australasia (WDAA), Bali, Indonesia.