A Network Theory Investigation into the Altered Resting State Functional Connectivity in Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

Anwaar Ul-Haq

Research output: Contribution to specialist publicationArticle

Abstract

In the last two decades, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has emerged as one of the most effective technologies in clinical research of the human brain. fMRI allows researchers to study healthy and pathological brains while they perform various neuropsychological functions. Beyond task-related activations, the human brain has some intrinsic activity at a task-negative (resting) state that surprisingly consumes a lot of energy to support communication among neurons. Recent neuroimaging research has also seen an increase in modeling and analyzing brain activity in terms of a graph or network. Since graph models facilitate a systems-theoretic explanation of the brain, they have become increasingly relevant with advances in network science and the popularization of complex systems theory. The purpose of this study is to look into the abnormalities in resting brain functions in adults with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). The primary goal is to investigate resting-state functional connectivity (FC), which can be construed as a significant temporal coincidence in blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) signals between functionally related brain regions in the absence of any stimulus or task. When compared to healthy controls, ADHD patients have lower average connectivity in the Supramarginal Gyrus and Superior Parietal Lobule, but higher connectivity in the Lateral Occipital Cortex and Inferior Temporal Gyrus. We also hypothesize that the network organization of default mode and dorsal attention regions is abnormal in ADHD patients.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages14
Specialist publicationarXiv
Publication statusPublished - 2022

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