A new teacher for a new nation? Teacher education, 'English', and schooling in early twentieth-century Australia

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Abstract

The late nineteenth-century expansion of public schooling in Australia from an initial focus on the elementary phase to post-primary provision, and then to a more systematic secondary education over the early to mid-twentieth century, went hand in hand with the emergence of new populations of children and young people ' a new constituency. In turn, these developments called into being a New Teacher, and a new system of teacher education, formed in accordance with what was widely understood as the New Education. Moreover, this was conceived as clearly in the service of nation-building. This paper traces aspects of the history of teacher education in Australia in the first half of the twentieth century, proposing that this is best understood with reference to the cultural and ideological significance of English teaching and the English language, nation and empire.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)361-379
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Educational Administration and History
Volume44
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2012

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