A strategic framework for monitoring coastal change in Australia's wet-dry tropics: concepts and progress

Colin Finlayson, Ian Eliot, Matthew Eliot

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A strategic framework for monitoring natural and human-induced change in the coastal plains of the Alligator Rivers Region in the wet-dry tropics of northern Australia is presented. The framework also supports refinement of methods used to monitor the vulnerability of coastal areas to change, including human-induced climate change and sea-level rise. The information derived through the framework can be used to assess scenarios, highlight the potential significance and implications of changes, and assist land managers formulate management responses.The framework incorporates several large-scale studies for monitoring atmospheric and hydrodynamic processes as well as mapping and monitoring projects specific to environmental change in the freshwater wetlands and the floodplains of the Region. Monitoring is proposed to address processes influencing the stability and rate of change of the floodplain environments. These include large scale processes, such as inter-annual variability in weather conditions affecting the morphology of the coastal plains, shoreline and riverbank stabilisation,headward expansion of tidal creeks, and salinisation of freshwater basins.Information management is also addressed, and a Geographic Information System structure proposed for effective data collation, analysis and management.The information management system will facilitate data sharing and participation of multiple agencies and organisations interested in coastal change, especially where a landscape perspective or whole ecosystem approach is advocated.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)109-123
Number of pages15
JournalGeographical Research
Volume47
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009

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