A woman's work is never certificated? How the implementation of nationally recognised training in workplaces helps women get qualifications

Erica Smith

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    9 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    This article examines the increased incidence of work-related qualifications for women in areas of work served by the vocational education and training (VET) system in Australia. Until 20 years ago, qualifications were generally available only for areas of work usually undertaken by men, apart from a few specific 'women's occupations' such as childcare and hairdressing. Now, as a result of the period known as 'training reform', industry training packages cover most areas of work and so qualifications are more widely available to women as well as to men. In particular, the increased incidence of employer-based accredited training, and the availability of traineeships for part-time work, have increased access for women to qualifications. Analysis of national VET and apprenticeship and traineeship figures is supplemented by evidence from a national research project. Women's voices describe the importance to them of gaining qualifications, but a critical analysis is also offered of the nature of the training offered in these new qualifications.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)531-549
    Number of pages19
    JournalJournal of Vocational Education and Training
    Volume58
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2006

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