Abundance of Probiotics and Butyrate-Production Microbiome Manages Constipation via Short-Chain Fatty Acids Production and Hormones Secretion

Min Zhuang, Wenting Shang, Qiuchen Ma, Padraig Strappe, Zhongkai Zhou

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Scope: The characteristics of gut microbiota and host metabolism are hypothesized to be associated with constipation status, but the regulation mechanism is not fully understood. Thus, the current study investigates the effect of constipation symptoms on gut functionality following the modulation of gut microbiota and metabolites via dietary fiber intervention. Methods and results: Constipation causes a significantly reduced short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) production and a higher level of iso-butyrate. The feces of constipated people are characterized with inhibited Faecalibacterium, Ruminococcaceae and Roseburia abundance. Desulfovibrionaceae is identified to be an important endotoxin producer in constipated patients, and a butyrate-enriched SCFAs profile achieved by dietary fiber supplement accelerates gastrointestinal transit and increases the thickness of the mucosal layer, possibly through triggering the secretion of colonic hormones and enhancing the expression of tight junction proteins for maintaining intestinal barrier integrity. More importantly, an interacting regulatory mechanism among SCFAs, in particular butyrate and propionate, may be involved in signaling between the microbiome and host cells in the colon. Conclusion: Gut microbiota, characterized with enriched butyrate-producing and depressed Desulfovibrionaceae bacteria, attenuates constipation symptoms through promoting intestinal hormones secretion and maintaining gut barrier integrity.
Original languageEnglish
Article number1801187
Pages (from-to)1-13
Number of pages13
JournalMolecular Nutrition and Food Research
Volume63
Issue number23
Early online date25 Sep 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 02 Dec 2019

Fingerprint

constipation
Volatile Fatty Acids
Butyrates
hormone secretion
Microbiota
Probiotics
short chain fatty acids
Constipation
butyrates
probiotics
Desulfovibrionaceae
intestinal microorganisms
Hormones
Dietary Fiber
signs and symptoms (animals and humans)
Roseburia
dietary fiber
digestive system
Gastrointestinal Transit
Intestinal Secretions

Cite this

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title = "Abundance of Probiotics and Butyrate-Production Microbiome Manages Constipation via Short-Chain Fatty Acids Production and Hormones Secretion",
abstract = "Scope: The characteristics of gut microbiota and host metabolism are hypothesized to be associated with constipation status, but the regulation mechanism is not fully understood. Thus, the current study investigates the effect of constipation symptoms on gut functionality following the modulation of gut microbiota and metabolites via dietary fiber intervention. Methods and results: Constipation causes a significantly reduced short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) production and a higher level of iso-butyrate. The feces of constipated people are characterized with inhibited Faecalibacterium, Ruminococcaceae and Roseburia abundance. Desulfovibrionaceae is identified to be an important endotoxin producer in constipated patients, and a butyrate-enriched SCFAs profile achieved by dietary fiber supplement accelerates gastrointestinal transit and increases the thickness of the mucosal layer, possibly through triggering the secretion of colonic hormones and enhancing the expression of tight junction proteins for maintaining intestinal barrier integrity. More importantly, an interacting regulatory mechanism among SCFAs, in particular butyrate and propionate, may be involved in signaling between the microbiome and host cells in the colon. Conclusion: Gut microbiota, characterized with enriched butyrate-producing and depressed Desulfovibrionaceae bacteria, attenuates constipation symptoms through promoting intestinal hormones secretion and maintaining gut barrier integrity.",
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Abundance of Probiotics and Butyrate-Production Microbiome Manages Constipation via Short-Chain Fatty Acids Production and Hormones Secretion. / Zhuang, Min; Shang, Wenting; Ma, Qiuchen; Strappe, Padraig; Zhou, Zhongkai.

In: Molecular Nutrition and Food Research, Vol. 63, No. 23, 1801187, 02.12.2019, p. 1-13.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Abundance of Probiotics and Butyrate-Production Microbiome Manages Constipation via Short-Chain Fatty Acids Production and Hormones Secretion

AU - Zhuang, Min

AU - Shang, Wenting

AU - Ma, Qiuchen

AU - Strappe, Padraig

AU - Zhou, Zhongkai

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AB - Scope: The characteristics of gut microbiota and host metabolism are hypothesized to be associated with constipation status, but the regulation mechanism is not fully understood. Thus, the current study investigates the effect of constipation symptoms on gut functionality following the modulation of gut microbiota and metabolites via dietary fiber intervention. Methods and results: Constipation causes a significantly reduced short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) production and a higher level of iso-butyrate. The feces of constipated people are characterized with inhibited Faecalibacterium, Ruminococcaceae and Roseburia abundance. Desulfovibrionaceae is identified to be an important endotoxin producer in constipated patients, and a butyrate-enriched SCFAs profile achieved by dietary fiber supplement accelerates gastrointestinal transit and increases the thickness of the mucosal layer, possibly through triggering the secretion of colonic hormones and enhancing the expression of tight junction proteins for maintaining intestinal barrier integrity. More importantly, an interacting regulatory mechanism among SCFAs, in particular butyrate and propionate, may be involved in signaling between the microbiome and host cells in the colon. Conclusion: Gut microbiota, characterized with enriched butyrate-producing and depressed Desulfovibrionaceae bacteria, attenuates constipation symptoms through promoting intestinal hormones secretion and maintaining gut barrier integrity.

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