Academic time diaries: Measuring what Australian academics actually do

Research output: Book chapter/Published conference paperConference paper

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Abstract

Academics and universities have an interest in tracking the tasks and workloads of academics in the areas of teaching, research and administration, but do academics and their employers know how many hours a week an academic engages in particular tasks? We discuss the on-going development of an electronic time diary tool to measure an academic's teaching, research and administrative tasks. Our preliminary findings suggest that time spent communicating with students is now a significant portion of an academic workday. Academics work long hours interrupted by the demands of students as customers coupled with increasing accountability and compliance within universities. We find that academics value aspects of their work which foster self-direction and creativity in both teaching and research activities.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings for the 25th Australian and New Zealand Academy of Management Conference
Subtitle of host publicationFuture of work and organisations
Place of PublicationNew Zealand
PublisherANZAM
Pages1-18
Number of pages18
ISBN (Electronic)9781877040870
Publication statusPublished - 2011
Event25th Australian and New Zealand Academy of Management Conference: ANZAM 2011 - Amora Hotel, Wellington, New Zealand
Duration: 07 Dec 201109 Dec 2011
https://web.archive.org/web/20110814080609/http://www.anzamconference.org:80/ (Conference website)
https://web.archive.org/web/20110814080609/http://www.anzamconference.org:80/ (Conference website )

Conference

Conference25th Australian and New Zealand Academy of Management Conference
Abbreviated titleThe Future of Work and Organisations
CountryNew Zealand
CityWellington
Period07/12/1109/12/11
Internet address

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teaching research
university
know how
workload
creativity
employer
customer
student
time
electronics
responsibility
Teaching
Values

Cite this

Duncan, R., Krivokapic-Skoko, B., Tilbrook, K., & Chopping, E. (2011). Academic time diaries: Measuring what Australian academics actually do. In Proceedings for the 25th Australian and New Zealand Academy of Management Conference: Future of work and organisations (pp. 1-18). New Zealand: ANZAM.
Duncan, Roderick ; Krivokapic-Skoko, Branka ; Tilbrook, Kerry ; Chopping, Errol. / Academic time diaries : Measuring what Australian academics actually do. Proceedings for the 25th Australian and New Zealand Academy of Management Conference: Future of work and organisations. New Zealand : ANZAM, 2011. pp. 1-18
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Duncan, R, Krivokapic-Skoko, B, Tilbrook, K & Chopping, E 2011, Academic time diaries: Measuring what Australian academics actually do. in Proceedings for the 25th Australian and New Zealand Academy of Management Conference: Future of work and organisations. ANZAM, New Zealand, pp. 1-18, 25th Australian and New Zealand Academy of Management Conference, Wellington, New Zealand, 07/12/11.

Academic time diaries : Measuring what Australian academics actually do. / Duncan, Roderick; Krivokapic-Skoko, Branka; Tilbrook, Kerry; Chopping, Errol.

Proceedings for the 25th Australian and New Zealand Academy of Management Conference: Future of work and organisations. New Zealand : ANZAM, 2011. p. 1-18.

Research output: Book chapter/Published conference paperConference paper

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Duncan R, Krivokapic-Skoko B, Tilbrook K, Chopping E. Academic time diaries: Measuring what Australian academics actually do. In Proceedings for the 25th Australian and New Zealand Academy of Management Conference: Future of work and organisations. New Zealand: ANZAM. 2011. p. 1-18