Accumulation of heavy metals by naturally colonising Typha domingensis (Poales: Typhaceae) in waste-rock dump leachate storage ponds in a gold'copper mine in the central tablelands of New South Wales, Australia

Allan Adams, Anantanarayanan Raman, Dennis Hodgkins, Helen Nicol

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Naturally colonised populations of Typha domingensis in mine waste-rock dumpleachate ponds (northern leachate pond [NLP] and southern leachate pond [SLP] anda nearby reference site (Cadiangullong Creek [CAC] were analysed for accumulationof Cu, Mn, and Zn in the winter of 2010 and early autumn of 2011. Concentrationsin sediment, leachate and creek water at NLP, SLP, and CAC were also analysed forCu, Mn, and Zn. Linear regression of Cu, Mn, and Zn concentrations in the leachateat each site revealed a significant reduction in these metals at NLP only in earlyautumn as leachate travelled away from the toe of the waste-rock dump and throughthe naturally colonised populations of T. domingensis. This study indicates that thisspecies is a suitable candidate for the process of phytoimmobilisation of the testedmetals.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)294-307
Number of pages14
JournalInternational Journal of Mining, Reclamation and Environment
Volume27
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2013

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