Accuracy of horse workload perception by owners when compared to published workload parameters

Catherine Hale, A Hemmings, Hayley Randle

Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting Abstract

Abstract

A noted consequence of modern management of equids is that obesity is becoming ever more problematic. Over-consumption of a highly calorific diet, coupled with an increasingly sedentary lifestyle, appears to be instrumental. In order to accurately provide a suitable ration, the weight of the horse, plus the workload they are in must be considered. The aim of this study was to compare the level of work a horse was in, with the perceived level of work that the owner attributed. A face-to-face survey was carried out with owners of 1,207 horses. Owners were asked to state the level of workload their horse was in, the levels being thus: maintenance, light, medium, hard and very hard work. Each owner was then asked how many times per week they rode/worked their horse; the length of time each bout of work lasted, and the type of exercise the work formed. Using this information, each horse was assigned to one of the previously mentioned five workload categories, based on the description of each category stated in NRC (2007). Data were analysed using a Mann-Whitney U (Wilcoxon rank sum) test via Genstat 14. It was found that data were significantly different(U¼446317.5, d.f. ¼ 1206, P < 0.001), with the owner-perceived score being significantly higher than the actual score. It is therefore possible to conclude that horse owners in the UK significantly overestimate the amount of work that their horses are in, which may inturn, lead to over-feeding and confound the problems of obesity in the domestic horse population.
Original languageEnglish
Article number58
Pages (from-to)94-94
Number of pages1
JournalJournal of Veterinary Behavior: clinical applications and research
Volume15
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016
Event12th International Equitation Science Conference (ISES 2016) - French National Riding School, Saumur, France
Duration: 23 Jun 201625 Jun 2016
http://equitationscience.com/previous-conferences/2016-12th-international-conference
file:///D:/Users/mmonta07/Downloads/Proceedings%20ISES%202016.pdf (Conference proceedings)

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Workload
Horses
horses
Nonparametric Statistics
obesity
Obesity
Sedentary Lifestyle
exercise
Maintenance
Diet
Light
Weights and Measures
diet
Population

Cite this

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title = "Accuracy of horse workload perception by owners when compared to published workload parameters",
abstract = "A noted consequence of modern management of equids is that obesity is becoming ever more problematic. Over-consumption of a highly calorific diet, coupled with an increasingly sedentary lifestyle, appears to be instrumental. In order to accurately provide a suitable ration, the weight of the horse, plus the workload they are in must be considered. The aim of this study was to compare the level of work a horse was in, with the perceived level of work that the owner attributed. A face-to-face survey was carried out with owners of 1,207 horses. Owners were asked to state the level of workload their horse was in, the levels being thus: maintenance, light, medium, hard and very hard work. Each owner was then asked how many times per week they rode/worked their horse; the length of time each bout of work lasted, and the type of exercise the work formed. Using this information, each horse was assigned to one of the previously mentioned five workload categories, based on the description of each category stated in NRC (2007). Data were analysed using a Mann-Whitney U (Wilcoxon rank sum) test via Genstat 14. It was found that data were significantly different(U¼446317.5, d.f. ¼ 1206, P < 0.001), with the owner-perceived score being significantly higher than the actual score. It is therefore possible to conclude that horse owners in the UK significantly overestimate the amount of work that their horses are in, which may inturn, lead to over-feeding and confound the problems of obesity in the domestic horse population.",
keywords = "nutrition, workload, diet, owner perception, obesity",
author = "Catherine Hale and A Hemmings and Hayley Randle",
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Accuracy of horse workload perception by owners when compared to published workload parameters. / Hale, Catherine; Hemmings, A; Randle, Hayley.

In: Journal of Veterinary Behavior: clinical applications and research, Vol. 15, 58, 2016, p. 94-94.

Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting Abstract

TY - JOUR

T1 - Accuracy of horse workload perception by owners when compared to published workload parameters

AU - Hale, Catherine

AU - Hemmings, A

AU - Randle, Hayley

PY - 2016

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N2 - A noted consequence of modern management of equids is that obesity is becoming ever more problematic. Over-consumption of a highly calorific diet, coupled with an increasingly sedentary lifestyle, appears to be instrumental. In order to accurately provide a suitable ration, the weight of the horse, plus the workload they are in must be considered. The aim of this study was to compare the level of work a horse was in, with the perceived level of work that the owner attributed. A face-to-face survey was carried out with owners of 1,207 horses. Owners were asked to state the level of workload their horse was in, the levels being thus: maintenance, light, medium, hard and very hard work. Each owner was then asked how many times per week they rode/worked their horse; the length of time each bout of work lasted, and the type of exercise the work formed. Using this information, each horse was assigned to one of the previously mentioned five workload categories, based on the description of each category stated in NRC (2007). Data were analysed using a Mann-Whitney U (Wilcoxon rank sum) test via Genstat 14. It was found that data were significantly different(U¼446317.5, d.f. ¼ 1206, P < 0.001), with the owner-perceived score being significantly higher than the actual score. It is therefore possible to conclude that horse owners in the UK significantly overestimate the amount of work that their horses are in, which may inturn, lead to over-feeding and confound the problems of obesity in the domestic horse population.

AB - A noted consequence of modern management of equids is that obesity is becoming ever more problematic. Over-consumption of a highly calorific diet, coupled with an increasingly sedentary lifestyle, appears to be instrumental. In order to accurately provide a suitable ration, the weight of the horse, plus the workload they are in must be considered. The aim of this study was to compare the level of work a horse was in, with the perceived level of work that the owner attributed. A face-to-face survey was carried out with owners of 1,207 horses. Owners were asked to state the level of workload their horse was in, the levels being thus: maintenance, light, medium, hard and very hard work. Each owner was then asked how many times per week they rode/worked their horse; the length of time each bout of work lasted, and the type of exercise the work formed. Using this information, each horse was assigned to one of the previously mentioned five workload categories, based on the description of each category stated in NRC (2007). Data were analysed using a Mann-Whitney U (Wilcoxon rank sum) test via Genstat 14. It was found that data were significantly different(U¼446317.5, d.f. ¼ 1206, P < 0.001), with the owner-perceived score being significantly higher than the actual score. It is therefore possible to conclude that horse owners in the UK significantly overestimate the amount of work that their horses are in, which may inturn, lead to over-feeding and confound the problems of obesity in the domestic horse population.

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KW - owner perception

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DO - 10.1016/j.jveb.2016.08.065

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