Achievement, language, and technology use among college-bound deaf learners

Kathryn Crowe, Marc Marschark, Jesper Dammeyer, Christine Lehane

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Deaf learners are a highly heterogeneous group who demonstrate varied levels of academic achievement and attainment. Most prior research involving this population has focused on factors facilitating academic success in young deaf children, with less attention paid to older learners. Recent studies, however, have suggested that while factors such as early cochlear implantation and early sign language fluency are positively associated with academic achievement in younger deaf children, they no longer predict achievement once children reach high school age. This study, involving data from 980 college-bound high school students with hearing loss, examined relations between academic achievement, communication variables (audiological, language), and use of assistive technologies (e.g., cochlear implants [CIs], FMsystems) and other support services (e.g., interpreting, real-time text) in the classroom. Spoken language skills were positively related to achievement in some domains, while better sign language skills were related to poorer achievement in others. Among these college-bound students, use of CIs and academic support services in high school accounted for little variability in their college entrance examination scores.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)393-401
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education
Volume22
Issue number4
Early online dateAug 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01 Oct 2017

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