Achy breaky makey wakey heart? A randomised crossover trial of musical prompts

Malcolm Woollard, Jason Poposki, Brae McWhinnie, Lettie Rawlins, Graham Munro, Peter O'Meara

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective Compared with no music (NM), does listening to 'Achy breaky heart' (ABH) or 'Disco science' (DS) increase the proportion of prehospital professionals delivering chest compressions at 2010 guideline-compliant rates of 100-120 bpm and 50-60 mm depths? Methods A randomised crossover trial recruiting at an Australian ambulance conference. Volunteers performed three 1-min sequences of continuous chest compressions on a manikin accompanied by NM, repeated choruses of ABH and DS, prerandomised for order. Results 37 of 74 participants were men; median age 37 years; 61% were paramedics, 20% students and 19% other health professionals. 54% had taken cardiopulmonary resuscitation training within 1 year. Differences in compression rate (mode, IQR) were significant for NM (105, 99-116) versus ABH (120, 107-120) and DS (104, 103-107) versus ABH (p<0.001) but not NM versus DS (p=0.478). Differences in proportions of participants compressing at 100-120 bpm were significant for DS (61/74, 82%) versus NM (48/74, 65%, p=0.007) and DS versus ABH (47/74, 64%, p=0.007) but not NM versus ABH (p=1). Differences in compression depth were significant for NM (48 mm, 46-59 mm) versus DS (54 mm, 44-58 mm, p=0.042) but not NM versus ABH (54 mm, 43-59 mm, p=0.065) and DS versus ABH (p=0.879). Differences in proportions of subjects compressing at 50-60 mm were not significant (NM 31/74 (42%); ABH 32/74 (43%); DS 29/74 (39%); all p>0.5). Conclusions Listening to DS significantly increased the proportion of prehospital professionals compressing at 2010 guideline-compliant rates. Regardless of intervention more than half gave compressions that were too shallow. Alternative audible feedback mechanisms may be more effective.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)290-294
Number of pages5
JournalEmergency Medicine Journal
Volume29
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2012

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    Woollard, M., Poposki, J., McWhinnie, B., Rawlins, L., Munro, G., & O'Meara, P. (2012). Achy breaky makey wakey heart? A randomised crossover trial of musical prompts. Emergency Medicine Journal, 29(4), 290-294. https://doi.org/10.1136/emermed-2011-200187