Adaptation to an electropalatograph palate

Acoustic, impressionistic, and perceptual data

Sharynne McLeod, Jeff Searl

Research output: Book chapter/Published conference paperChapter

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate adaptation to the electropalatograph (EPG) from the perspective of consonant acoustics, listener perceptions, and speaker ratings. METHOD: Seven adults with typical speech wore an EPG and pseudo-EPG palate over 2 days and produced syllables, read a passage, counted, and rated their adaptation to the palate. Consonant acoustics, listener ratings, and speaker ratings were analyzed. RESULTS: The spectral mean for the burst (/t/) and frication (/s/) was reduced for the first 60'120 min of wearing the pseudo-EPG palate. Temporal features (stop gap, frication, and syllable duration) were unaffected by wearing the pseudo-EPG palate. The EPG palate had a similar effect on consonant acoustics as the pseudo-EPG palate. Expert listener ratings indicated minimal to no change in speech naturalness or distortion from the pseudo-EPG or EPG palate. The sounds /t, d, , s, z, / were most likely to be affected. Speaker self-ratings related to oral comfort, speech, tongue movement, appearance, and oral sensation were negatively affected by the presence of the palatal devices. CONCLUSIONS: Speakers detected a substantial difference when wearing a palatal device, but the effects on speech were minimal based on listener ratings. Spectral features of consonants were initially affected, although adaptation occurred. Wearing an EPG or pseudo-EPG palate for approximately 2 hr results in relatively normal-sounding speech with acoustic features similar to a no-palate condition.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationClinical linguistics
Subtitle of host publicationCritical concepts in linguistics
EditorsThomas W Powell, Martin J Ball
Place of PublicationAbingdon, Oxford, UK
PublisherRoutledge
Pages192-206
Number of pages15
Volume15 (2006)
Edition33
ISBN (Print)9780415481250
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009

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Palate
Acoustics
Speech Acoustics
Equipment and Supplies
Tongue

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McLeod, S., & Searl, J. (2009). Adaptation to an electropalatograph palate: Acoustic, impressionistic, and perceptual data. In T. W. Powell, & M. J. Ball (Eds.), Clinical linguistics: Critical concepts in linguistics (33 ed., Vol. 15 (2006), pp. 192-206). Abingdon, Oxford, UK: Routledge. https://doi.org/10.1044/1058-0360(2006/018)
McLeod, Sharynne ; Searl, Jeff. / Adaptation to an electropalatograph palate : Acoustic, impressionistic, and perceptual data. Clinical linguistics: Critical concepts in linguistics. editor / Thomas W Powell ; Martin J Ball. Vol. 15 (2006) 33. ed. Abingdon, Oxford, UK : Routledge, 2009. pp. 192-206
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abstract = "PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate adaptation to the electropalatograph (EPG) from the perspective of consonant acoustics, listener perceptions, and speaker ratings. METHOD: Seven adults with typical speech wore an EPG and pseudo-EPG palate over 2 days and produced syllables, read a passage, counted, and rated their adaptation to the palate. Consonant acoustics, listener ratings, and speaker ratings were analyzed. RESULTS: The spectral mean for the burst (/t/) and frication (/s/) was reduced for the first 60'120 min of wearing the pseudo-EPG palate. Temporal features (stop gap, frication, and syllable duration) were unaffected by wearing the pseudo-EPG palate. The EPG palate had a similar effect on consonant acoustics as the pseudo-EPG palate. Expert listener ratings indicated minimal to no change in speech naturalness or distortion from the pseudo-EPG or EPG palate. The sounds /t, d, , s, z, / were most likely to be affected. Speaker self-ratings related to oral comfort, speech, tongue movement, appearance, and oral sensation were negatively affected by the presence of the palatal devices. CONCLUSIONS: Speakers detected a substantial difference when wearing a palatal device, but the effects on speech were minimal based on listener ratings. Spectral features of consonants were initially affected, although adaptation occurred. Wearing an EPG or pseudo-EPG palate for approximately 2 hr results in relatively normal-sounding speech with acoustic features similar to a no-palate condition.",
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McLeod, S & Searl, J 2009, Adaptation to an electropalatograph palate: Acoustic, impressionistic, and perceptual data. in TW Powell & MJ Ball (eds), Clinical linguistics: Critical concepts in linguistics. 33 edn, vol. 15 (2006), Routledge, Abingdon, Oxford, UK, pp. 192-206. https://doi.org/10.1044/1058-0360(2006/018)

Adaptation to an electropalatograph palate : Acoustic, impressionistic, and perceptual data. / McLeod, Sharynne; Searl, Jeff.

Clinical linguistics: Critical concepts in linguistics. ed. / Thomas W Powell; Martin J Ball. Vol. 15 (2006) 33. ed. Abingdon, Oxford, UK : Routledge, 2009. p. 192-206.

Research output: Book chapter/Published conference paperChapter

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T1 - Adaptation to an electropalatograph palate

T2 - Acoustic, impressionistic, and perceptual data

AU - McLeod, Sharynne

AU - Searl, Jeff

N1 - Imported on 12 May 2017 - DigiTool details were: publisher = Abingdon, Oxford, UK: Routledge, 2009. editor/s (773b) = Thomas W Powell and Martin J Ball ; Volume no. (773r) = 15 (2006); Issue no. (773s) = 33; Parent title (773t) = Clinical linguistics: Critical concepts in linguistics.

PY - 2009

Y1 - 2009

N2 - PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate adaptation to the electropalatograph (EPG) from the perspective of consonant acoustics, listener perceptions, and speaker ratings. METHOD: Seven adults with typical speech wore an EPG and pseudo-EPG palate over 2 days and produced syllables, read a passage, counted, and rated their adaptation to the palate. Consonant acoustics, listener ratings, and speaker ratings were analyzed. RESULTS: The spectral mean for the burst (/t/) and frication (/s/) was reduced for the first 60'120 min of wearing the pseudo-EPG palate. Temporal features (stop gap, frication, and syllable duration) were unaffected by wearing the pseudo-EPG palate. The EPG palate had a similar effect on consonant acoustics as the pseudo-EPG palate. Expert listener ratings indicated minimal to no change in speech naturalness or distortion from the pseudo-EPG or EPG palate. The sounds /t, d, , s, z, / were most likely to be affected. Speaker self-ratings related to oral comfort, speech, tongue movement, appearance, and oral sensation were negatively affected by the presence of the palatal devices. CONCLUSIONS: Speakers detected a substantial difference when wearing a palatal device, but the effects on speech were minimal based on listener ratings. Spectral features of consonants were initially affected, although adaptation occurred. Wearing an EPG or pseudo-EPG palate for approximately 2 hr results in relatively normal-sounding speech with acoustic features similar to a no-palate condition.

AB - PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate adaptation to the electropalatograph (EPG) from the perspective of consonant acoustics, listener perceptions, and speaker ratings. METHOD: Seven adults with typical speech wore an EPG and pseudo-EPG palate over 2 days and produced syllables, read a passage, counted, and rated their adaptation to the palate. Consonant acoustics, listener ratings, and speaker ratings were analyzed. RESULTS: The spectral mean for the burst (/t/) and frication (/s/) was reduced for the first 60'120 min of wearing the pseudo-EPG palate. Temporal features (stop gap, frication, and syllable duration) were unaffected by wearing the pseudo-EPG palate. The EPG palate had a similar effect on consonant acoustics as the pseudo-EPG palate. Expert listener ratings indicated minimal to no change in speech naturalness or distortion from the pseudo-EPG or EPG palate. The sounds /t, d, , s, z, / were most likely to be affected. Speaker self-ratings related to oral comfort, speech, tongue movement, appearance, and oral sensation were negatively affected by the presence of the palatal devices. CONCLUSIONS: Speakers detected a substantial difference when wearing a palatal device, but the effects on speech were minimal based on listener ratings. Spectral features of consonants were initially affected, although adaptation occurred. Wearing an EPG or pseudo-EPG palate for approximately 2 hr results in relatively normal-sounding speech with acoustic features similar to a no-palate condition.

KW - Articulation

KW - Dentistry

KW - Instrumental assessment

KW - Palate

KW - Speech disorders

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DO - 10.1044/1058-0360(2006/018)

M3 - Chapter

SN - 9780415481250

VL - 15 (2006)

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EP - 206

BT - Clinical linguistics

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PB - Routledge

CY - Abingdon, Oxford, UK

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McLeod S, Searl J. Adaptation to an electropalatograph palate: Acoustic, impressionistic, and perceptual data. In Powell TW, Ball MJ, editors, Clinical linguistics: Critical concepts in linguistics. 33 ed. Vol. 15 (2006). Abingdon, Oxford, UK: Routledge. 2009. p. 192-206 https://doi.org/10.1044/1058-0360(2006/018)