Adaptive flood mobilities in Bangladesh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Global climate change has altered the efficacy of traditional responses to flooding in Bangladesh and requires the adoption of new actions and mobilities to strengthen the ongoing viability of the community. These changes need to be accompanied by appropriate government responses. We examined these changing mobilities in Bangladesh by first classifying them according to the relevant characteristics of emergency mobilities as described by Adey (anticipation, coordination, absence and difference) and then applying, as appropriate, one or more of Sheller and Urry’s (2006) six essential bodies of mobility theory to provide a dynamic analysis from which to generate policy responses. Major findings specific to Bangladesh include the criticality of social networks- although these may be weakened through lack of resources, and the mobility of gender roles due to flood-related migration. The policy implications, situated at the confluence of cultural tradition, the imperative to survive and current government policy which does not encourage mobility, focus on reconceptualising the use of land space to envisage a new paradigm of support for emergency mobility and resourcing people movement. Future research could apply this novel data analysis approach to other migration situations with the purpose of informing emergency mobility policy.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-15
Number of pages15
JournalMobilities
Early online date14 Oct 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

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Bangladesh
natural disaster
migration
cultural tradition
gender role
social network
dynamic analysis
confluence
government policy
global climate
viability
data analysis
climate change
flooding
paradigm
lack
resource
resources
community
policy

Cite this

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title = "Adaptive flood mobilities in Bangladesh",
abstract = "Global climate change has altered the efficacy of traditional responses to flooding in Bangladesh and requires the adoption of new actions and mobilities to strengthen the ongoing viability of the community. These changes need to be accompanied by appropriate government responses. We examined these changing mobilities in Bangladesh by first classifying them according to the relevant characteristics of emergency mobilities as described by Adey (anticipation, coordination, absence and difference) and then applying, as appropriate, one or more of Sheller and Urry’s (2006) six essential bodies of mobility theory to provide a dynamic analysis from which to generate policy responses. Major findings specific to Bangladesh include the criticality of social networks- although these may be weakened through lack of resources, and the mobility of gender roles due to flood-related migration. The policy implications, situated at the confluence of cultural tradition, the imperative to survive and current government policy which does not encourage mobility, focus on reconceptualising the use of land space to envisage a new paradigm of support for emergency mobility and resourcing people movement. Future research could apply this novel data analysis approach to other migration situations with the purpose of informing emergency mobility policy.",
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author = "Valerie Ingham and Islam, {Mir Rabiul} and John Hicks",
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Adaptive flood mobilities in Bangladesh. / Ingham, Valerie; Islam, Mir Rabiul; Hicks, John.

In: Mobilities, 2019, p. 1-15.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Adaptive flood mobilities in Bangladesh

AU - Ingham, Valerie

AU - Islam, Mir Rabiul

AU - Hicks, John

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

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AB - Global climate change has altered the efficacy of traditional responses to flooding in Bangladesh and requires the adoption of new actions and mobilities to strengthen the ongoing viability of the community. These changes need to be accompanied by appropriate government responses. We examined these changing mobilities in Bangladesh by first classifying them according to the relevant characteristics of emergency mobilities as described by Adey (anticipation, coordination, absence and difference) and then applying, as appropriate, one or more of Sheller and Urry’s (2006) six essential bodies of mobility theory to provide a dynamic analysis from which to generate policy responses. Major findings specific to Bangladesh include the criticality of social networks- although these may be weakened through lack of resources, and the mobility of gender roles due to flood-related migration. The policy implications, situated at the confluence of cultural tradition, the imperative to survive and current government policy which does not encourage mobility, focus on reconceptualising the use of land space to envisage a new paradigm of support for emergency mobility and resourcing people movement. Future research could apply this novel data analysis approach to other migration situations with the purpose of informing emergency mobility policy.

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