Ageing in Corrective Services: From the Perspective of Prison Chaplains.

Rhonda Shaw, Bruce Stevens, John Paget, Phillip Snoyman

Research output: Research - peer-reviewPresentation only

Abstract

In the year 2000, approximately 8.3 percent of the total prison population in Australia was aged 50 years and over. This figure increased to approximately 11.5 percent in 2010. The fastest growing group in corrective facilities in Australia are those aged over 65 years. There was a 134 percent increase in this age group between the year 2010 and 2014. The figures for New South Wales (NSW) are similar to the national averages. The number of inmates aged 65 years and over in NSW prisons has increased by approximately 225 percent over the past 10 years. The issue is whether or not corrective services is set up to cater for the increase in the number of older inmates. The current study reports the results of a qualitative study about ageing in a corrective facility. The results reveal four themes: the system, the services, the environment and the inmate. In conjunction these themes reveal a system that is not designed to cope with an ageing population but one that accentuates narcissism and selfishness because people become resentful of what has happened to them rather than for the damage they have done to somebody else. Eight prison chaplains from four corrective facilities in NSW were interviewed using a semi-structured interview schedule. The results of a thematic analysis revealed four main themes: the system, the services, the environment and the inmate. All of the chaplains interviewed for this study noted that there had been an increase in the number of older adults within corrective facilities in NSW. Increases were thought to be the result of a number of factors including people being charged at an older age, often as a result of sexual abuse, drug or fraud offences. Others have been incarcerated for a long period of time and have aged in prison or are repeat offenders. The first theme, the system, articulates a clear lack of planning for an ageing population. Nobody is articulating the vision of what the outcomes should be. As a result there are no systems directed at an outcome but rather an ad hoc approach of ‘what happens, happens’. The second theme is about the services, or lack thereof, available for inmates, particularly for older inmates. In general, the chaplains across all facilities agreed that there was a need for improved services for older inmates in terms of access to medical services and provision of aged care. However, the system itself, in terms of physical structures, is not conducive to catering for older inmates. Cells have double bunks, buildings are often multi-storied with stairs that need to be climbed a number of times throughout the day. While medical and aged care services were seen as lacking, chapel services were seen to provide an outlet for inmates to be engaged in some way. The theme, the environment, discusses a range of issues identified by the chaplains within the prison environment. These issues include the physical structures but also the lack of stimulation and the vulnerability experienced by some older adults. The final theme, the inmate, looks at the chaplains’ perceptions of the character of older inmates. The clear message from chaplains was that there was a lack of remorse from many older inmates for the crimes that they had committed. Remorse, when shown, was for their own losses rather than for the pain they had inflicted on others. The current system lacks processes and programs that enable proper rehabilitation for many inmates. As one chaplain noted the current system is “all about managing them.”

Conference

ConferenceHawaii University International Conferences
CountryUnited States
CityHonolulu
Period02/01/18 → …

Fingerprint

correctional institution
lack
offense
time
repeat offender
narcissism
medical services
fraud
sexual violence
rehabilitation
pain
age group
building
vulnerability
damages
drug
planning
interview
Group

Grant Number

  • 000101487

Cite this

Shaw, R., Stevens, B., Paget, J., & Snoyman, P. (2018). Ageing in Corrective Services: From the Perspective of Prison Chaplains.. Paper presented at Hawaii University International Conferences, Honolulu, United States.
Shaw, Rhonda ; Stevens, Bruce ; Paget, John ; Snoyman, Phillip. / Ageing in Corrective Services: From the Perspective of Prison Chaplains.Paper presented at Hawaii University International Conferences, Honolulu, United States.
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title = "Ageing in Corrective Services: From the Perspective of Prison Chaplains.",
abstract = "In the year 2000, approximately 8.3 percent of the total prison population in Australia was aged 50 years and over. This figure increased to approximately 11.5 percent in 2010. The fastest growing group in corrective facilities in Australia are those aged over 65 years. There was a 134 percent increase in this age group between the year 2010 and 2014. The figures for New South Wales (NSW) are similar to the national averages. The number of inmates aged 65 years and over in NSW prisons has increased by approximately 225 percent over the past 10 years. The issue is whether or not corrective services is set up to cater for the increase in the number of older inmates. The current study reports the results of a qualitative study about ageing in a corrective facility. The results reveal four themes: the system, the services, the environment and the inmate. In conjunction these themes reveal a system that is not designed to cope with an ageing population but one that accentuates narcissism and selfishness because people become resentful of what has happened to them rather than for the damage they have done to somebody else. Eight prison chaplains from four corrective facilities in NSW were interviewed using a semi-structured interview schedule. The results of a thematic analysis revealed four main themes: the system, the services, the environment and the inmate. All of the chaplains interviewed for this study noted that there had been an increase in the number of older adults within corrective facilities in NSW. Increases were thought to be the result of a number of factors including people being charged at an older age, often as a result of sexual abuse, drug or fraud offences. Others have been incarcerated for a long period of time and have aged in prison or are repeat offenders. The first theme, the system, articulates a clear lack of planning for an ageing population. Nobody is articulating the vision of what the outcomes should be. As a result there are no systems directed at an outcome but rather an ad hoc approach of ‘what happens, happens’. The second theme is about the services, or lack thereof, available for inmates, particularly for older inmates. In general, the chaplains across all facilities agreed that there was a need for improved services for older inmates in terms of access to medical services and provision of aged care. However, the system itself, in terms of physical structures, is not conducive to catering for older inmates. Cells have double bunks, buildings are often multi-storied with stairs that need to be climbed a number of times throughout the day. While medical and aged care services were seen as lacking, chapel services were seen to provide an outlet for inmates to be engaged in some way. The theme, the environment, discusses a range of issues identified by the chaplains within the prison environment. These issues include the physical structures but also the lack of stimulation and the vulnerability experienced by some older adults. The final theme, the inmate, looks at the chaplains’ perceptions of the character of older inmates. The clear message from chaplains was that there was a lack of remorse from many older inmates for the crimes that they had committed. Remorse, when shown, was for their own losses rather than for the pain they had inflicted on others. The current system lacks processes and programs that enable proper rehabilitation for many inmates. As one chaplain noted the current system is “all about managing them.”",
author = "Rhonda Shaw and Bruce Stevens and John Paget and Phillip Snoyman",
year = "2018",

}

Shaw, R, Stevens, B, Paget, J & Snoyman, P 2018, 'Ageing in Corrective Services: From the Perspective of Prison Chaplains.' Paper presented at Hawaii University International Conferences, Honolulu, United States, 02/01/18, .

Ageing in Corrective Services: From the Perspective of Prison Chaplains. / Shaw, Rhonda; Stevens, Bruce; Paget, John ; Snoyman, Phillip.

2018. Paper presented at Hawaii University International Conferences, Honolulu, United States.

Research output: Research - peer-reviewPresentation only

TY - CONF

T1 - Ageing in Corrective Services: From the Perspective of Prison Chaplains.

AU - Shaw,Rhonda

AU - Stevens,Bruce

AU - Paget,John

AU - Snoyman,Phillip

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - In the year 2000, approximately 8.3 percent of the total prison population in Australia was aged 50 years and over. This figure increased to approximately 11.5 percent in 2010. The fastest growing group in corrective facilities in Australia are those aged over 65 years. There was a 134 percent increase in this age group between the year 2010 and 2014. The figures for New South Wales (NSW) are similar to the national averages. The number of inmates aged 65 years and over in NSW prisons has increased by approximately 225 percent over the past 10 years. The issue is whether or not corrective services is set up to cater for the increase in the number of older inmates. The current study reports the results of a qualitative study about ageing in a corrective facility. The results reveal four themes: the system, the services, the environment and the inmate. In conjunction these themes reveal a system that is not designed to cope with an ageing population but one that accentuates narcissism and selfishness because people become resentful of what has happened to them rather than for the damage they have done to somebody else. Eight prison chaplains from four corrective facilities in NSW were interviewed using a semi-structured interview schedule. The results of a thematic analysis revealed four main themes: the system, the services, the environment and the inmate. All of the chaplains interviewed for this study noted that there had been an increase in the number of older adults within corrective facilities in NSW. Increases were thought to be the result of a number of factors including people being charged at an older age, often as a result of sexual abuse, drug or fraud offences. Others have been incarcerated for a long period of time and have aged in prison or are repeat offenders. The first theme, the system, articulates a clear lack of planning for an ageing population. Nobody is articulating the vision of what the outcomes should be. As a result there are no systems directed at an outcome but rather an ad hoc approach of ‘what happens, happens’. The second theme is about the services, or lack thereof, available for inmates, particularly for older inmates. In general, the chaplains across all facilities agreed that there was a need for improved services for older inmates in terms of access to medical services and provision of aged care. However, the system itself, in terms of physical structures, is not conducive to catering for older inmates. Cells have double bunks, buildings are often multi-storied with stairs that need to be climbed a number of times throughout the day. While medical and aged care services were seen as lacking, chapel services were seen to provide an outlet for inmates to be engaged in some way. The theme, the environment, discusses a range of issues identified by the chaplains within the prison environment. These issues include the physical structures but also the lack of stimulation and the vulnerability experienced by some older adults. The final theme, the inmate, looks at the chaplains’ perceptions of the character of older inmates. The clear message from chaplains was that there was a lack of remorse from many older inmates for the crimes that they had committed. Remorse, when shown, was for their own losses rather than for the pain they had inflicted on others. The current system lacks processes and programs that enable proper rehabilitation for many inmates. As one chaplain noted the current system is “all about managing them.”

AB - In the year 2000, approximately 8.3 percent of the total prison population in Australia was aged 50 years and over. This figure increased to approximately 11.5 percent in 2010. The fastest growing group in corrective facilities in Australia are those aged over 65 years. There was a 134 percent increase in this age group between the year 2010 and 2014. The figures for New South Wales (NSW) are similar to the national averages. The number of inmates aged 65 years and over in NSW prisons has increased by approximately 225 percent over the past 10 years. The issue is whether or not corrective services is set up to cater for the increase in the number of older inmates. The current study reports the results of a qualitative study about ageing in a corrective facility. The results reveal four themes: the system, the services, the environment and the inmate. In conjunction these themes reveal a system that is not designed to cope with an ageing population but one that accentuates narcissism and selfishness because people become resentful of what has happened to them rather than for the damage they have done to somebody else. Eight prison chaplains from four corrective facilities in NSW were interviewed using a semi-structured interview schedule. The results of a thematic analysis revealed four main themes: the system, the services, the environment and the inmate. All of the chaplains interviewed for this study noted that there had been an increase in the number of older adults within corrective facilities in NSW. Increases were thought to be the result of a number of factors including people being charged at an older age, often as a result of sexual abuse, drug or fraud offences. Others have been incarcerated for a long period of time and have aged in prison or are repeat offenders. The first theme, the system, articulates a clear lack of planning for an ageing population. Nobody is articulating the vision of what the outcomes should be. As a result there are no systems directed at an outcome but rather an ad hoc approach of ‘what happens, happens’. The second theme is about the services, or lack thereof, available for inmates, particularly for older inmates. In general, the chaplains across all facilities agreed that there was a need for improved services for older inmates in terms of access to medical services and provision of aged care. However, the system itself, in terms of physical structures, is not conducive to catering for older inmates. Cells have double bunks, buildings are often multi-storied with stairs that need to be climbed a number of times throughout the day. While medical and aged care services were seen as lacking, chapel services were seen to provide an outlet for inmates to be engaged in some way. The theme, the environment, discusses a range of issues identified by the chaplains within the prison environment. These issues include the physical structures but also the lack of stimulation and the vulnerability experienced by some older adults. The final theme, the inmate, looks at the chaplains’ perceptions of the character of older inmates. The clear message from chaplains was that there was a lack of remorse from many older inmates for the crimes that they had committed. Remorse, when shown, was for their own losses rather than for the pain they had inflicted on others. The current system lacks processes and programs that enable proper rehabilitation for many inmates. As one chaplain noted the current system is “all about managing them.”

M3 - Presentation only

ER -

Shaw R, Stevens B, Paget J, Snoyman P. Ageing in Corrective Services: From the Perspective of Prison Chaplains.. 2018. Paper presented at Hawaii University International Conferences, Honolulu, United States.