'All day there was a stream of curious visitors’: The cremation of Devan Singh in Albury, NSW, July 1905

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Abstract

During the 1890s a large number of Punjabi men migrated to Australia in order to further their family’s status at home through remittances. Even though the Punjabi, working as hawkers in rural and remote areas, provided an essential service, they were regarded as unwelcome competition, mainly by white un- and under-employed men during the period of economic recession of the mid-1890s. When economic conditions improved, the outright racism receded, but the Punjabi remained marginalised. This paper traces the relationship between Punjabi hawkers and the Anglo-Celtic host community, using the rural service centre of Albury (NSW, Australia) as the locale and the cremation of the hawker Devan Singh as an example.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)136-153
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of the Royal Australian Historical Society
Volume103
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 15 Dec 2017

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