Allelopathic potential of Amaranthus viridis L. against annual ryegrass

Shamima Sultana, Md Asaduzzaman

Research output: Book chapter/Published conference paperConference paper

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Abstract

Allelopathic effects of extracts from Amaranthus viridis on annual ryegrass have been observed in petri-dish bioassays. The result showed that germination percentage, plus root and shoot growth were significantly decreased compared to controls especially by extracts from dried samples. Extracts at 50% and 100% from dried samples and 100% from fresh plant samples were more toxic to ryegrass. Ryegrass was mostly inhibited by 100% followed by 50% dried and 50% fresh plant extract. The result also suggeststhat phytotoxicity of Amaranthus viridis depends on the extract's preparation procedures.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 18th Australasian Weeds Conference (2012)
Subtitle of host publicationDeveloping Solutions to Evolving Weed Problems
EditorsValerie Eldershaw
Place of PublicationMelbourne
PublisherWeed Society of Victoria
Pages181-183
Number of pages3
ISBN (Electronic)978-0-646-58670-0
Publication statusPublished - 2012
Event18th Australasian Weeds Conference (2012) - The Sebel and Citigate Albert Park, Melbourne, Australia
Duration: 08 Oct 201211 Oct 2012
http://caws.org.au/awc_contents.php?yr=2012 (Conference proceedings)

Conference

Conference18th Australasian Weeds Conference (2012)
Abbreviated titleDeveloping Solutions to Evolving Weed Problems
CountryAustralia
CityMelbourne
Period08/10/1211/10/12
Internet address

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  • Cite this

    Sultana, S., & Asaduzzaman, M. (2012). Allelopathic potential of Amaranthus viridis L. against annual ryegrass. In V. Eldershaw (Ed.), Proceedings of the 18th Australasian Weeds Conference (2012): Developing Solutions to Evolving Weed Problems (pp. 181-183). Weed Society of Victoria.