An embedded randomised controlled trial of a Teaser Campaign to optimise recruitment in primary care

Hopin Lee, Markus Hübscher, G. Lorimer Moseley, Steven J. Kamper, Adrian C. Traeger, Ian W. Skinner, Christopher M. Williams, James H. McAuley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Marketing communication and brand identity is a fundamental principle of advertising and end-user engagement. Health researchers have begun to apply this principle to trial recruitment in primary care. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether a Teaser Campaign using a series of postcards in advance of a conventional mail-out increases the number of primary care clinics that engage with a clinical trial. Methods: Embedded randomised recruitment trial across primary care clinics (general practitioners and physiotherapists) in the Sydney metropolitan area. Clinics in the Teaser Campaign group received a series of branded promotional postcards in advance of a standard letter inviting them to participate in a clinical trial. Clinics in the Standard Mail group did not receive the postcards. Results: From a total of 744 clinics that were sent an invitation letter, 46 clinics in the Teaser Campaign group and 40 clinics in the Standard Mail group responded (11.6% total response rate). There was no between-group difference in the odds of responding to the invitation letter (odds ratio = 1.18, 95% confidence interval = 0.75-1.85, p = 0.49). For physiotherapy clinics and general practice clinics, the odds ratios were 1.43 (confidence interval = 0.82-2.48, p = 0.21) and 0.77 (confidence interval = 0.34-1.75, p = 0.54), respectively. Conclusion: A Teaser Campaign using a series of branded promotional postcards did not improve clinic engagement for a randomised controlled trial in primary care.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)162-169
Number of pages8
JournalClinical Trials
Volume14
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01 Apr 2017

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'An embedded randomised controlled trial of a Teaser Campaign to optimise recruitment in primary care'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this