An empirical investigation of sexual harassment and work engagement: Surprising differences between men and women

Julie A. Cogin, Alan Fish

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    12 Citations (Scopus)
    20 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    Research has demonstrated the growing prevalence of sexual harassment (SH) across continents, industries and occupations as well as the associated negative outcomes (Glomb et al 1999). Not surprisingly, job satisfaction is one of the job-related variables that is frequently investigated in the SH literature, with Lapierre et al (2005) meta-analytically establishing that SH significantly diminishes job satisfaction. Other studies have argued, however, that 'satisfied' employees do not necessarily perform to the best of their abilities (Crossman & Abou-Zaki 2003) and that work engagement is a better construct to understand what makes employees 'go the extra mile' (Hallgerg & Schaufeli 2006; Buckingham & Coffman 1999). This study, conducted in Australia, adopted the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (Schaufeli et al 2002a), as an empirical gauge of the construct 'work engagement' and the Sexual Experiences Questionnaire (Fitzgerald et al 1988) to measure SH. A strong negative relationship was established in addition to significant differences in the SH experiences of men and women.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)47-61
    Number of pages15
    JournalJournal of Management and Organization
    Volume15
    Issue number1
    Publication statusPublished - Mar 2009

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'An empirical investigation of sexual harassment and work engagement: Surprising differences between men and women'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this