An evaluation and comprehensive guide to successful Aboriginal health promotion

James Charles

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: The object of this paper is to examine and evaluate a report on an Aboriginal health promotion program on: its effectiveness in reducing injury, poor foot health, smoking, alcohol consumption and improved diet for young Aboriginal people in a rural community. Also to provide a comprehensive guide to successful health promotion in Aboriginal communities.

Methods: Evaluation of assessments, results and feedback on a comprehensive Aboriginal health promotion package, which consisted of education and practical hands on sessions, designed to: reduce injury, assist poor foot health and provide education on the effects of smoking, alcohol consumption, and poor diet, specifically related to exercise, training and playing sport.

Results: Ankle, knee and back injuries were very high for participants. Only 1 participant that reported back at the 4 month follow up had an injury in that period and all participants stated that they had better knowledge of how to prevent injury. For participants who gave feedback at the 4 month follow up, 6 out of 16 (37.5%) had lost between 1 and 3kgs, 5 out of 16 (31%) had attempted or have now quit smoking, 3 out of 16 (19%) had reduced or quit drinking alcohol and 3 out of 16 (19%) had increased their intake of fruit and veg.

Conclusions: The multifaceted health promotion was very successful. Attendance at sessions were very high, which was a huge part of the success. The education sessions were flexible, and very practical and encouraged participation. The program was delivered how and when the Aboriginal community wanted it. Due to community ownership there was real enthusiasm for the program, and this was one of the main reason for the success.

Implications: The information gained from this evaluation will assist in identifying and developing a formula for success in Aboriginal health promotion that could be reproduced in any Aboriginal community on any topic.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-8
Number of pages8
JournalAustralian Indigenous Health Bulletin
Volume16
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'An evaluation and comprehensive guide to successful Aboriginal health promotion'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this