An examination of support and development mechanisms for newly qualified social workers across the UK: Implications for Australian Social Work

Bernadette Moorhead, Jill Manthorpe, Mary Baginsky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This paper examines support and development mechanisms in national graduate qualifying programmes in social work in the United Kingdom (UK), to identify possible implications for policy, research and consultation for Australia. Notwithstanding the Australian Association of Social Work’s Supervision Standards, the Association has not made specific provisions for new graduates within its policies relating to professional standards or continuing professional development. Using a document analysis method, the different mechanisms in place across the UK indicate the potential value of exploring these countries’ systems to inform debate within the Australian Association on the possible creation of national standards. The UK experience suggests that any new standards or policy might be effective if they are underpinned by a developmental perspective on new graduates and acceptance of the shared responsibility for support between professional stakeholders. Possible pathways for research and consultation are outlined to develop a better understanding of career profiles, retention, and graduate needs that are contextual to Australia.
Original languageEnglish
JournalPractice (UK)
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 05 Sep 2019

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social worker
social work
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document analysis
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supervision
acceptance
stakeholder
career
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Cite this

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abstract = "This paper examines support and development mechanisms in national graduate qualifying programmes in social work in the United Kingdom (UK), to identify possible implications for policy, research and consultation for Australia. Notwithstanding the Australian Association of Social Work’s Supervision Standards, the Association has not made specific provisions for new graduates within its policies relating to professional standards or continuing professional development. Using a document analysis method, the different mechanisms in place across the UK indicate the potential value of exploring these countries’ systems to inform debate within the Australian Association on the possible creation of national standards. The UK experience suggests that any new standards or policy might be effective if they are underpinned by a developmental perspective on new graduates and acceptance of the shared responsibility for support between professional stakeholders. Possible pathways for research and consultation are outlined to develop a better understanding of career profiles, retention, and graduate needs that are contextual to Australia.",
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