An industry-level analysis of potential intangible and economic impacts affecting Australian pork producers during an emergency animal disease control program

Sarah-Jane Wilson, Michael Ward, Victoria Brookes

Research output: Other contribution to conferencePosterpeer-review

Abstract

Emerging and transboundary diseases have been responsible for dramatic impacts on human health, the economy, trade, animal health and biodiversity in Australia and around the world. The Australian pig industry’s health status provides it with a competitive advantage. Freedom from major transboundary diseases – such as foot-and-mouth disease and classical swine fever – secures access to international markets and enables producers to invest in their businesses free from the complication of major disease incursions, ensures the industry’s future sustainability and allows it to meet community standards for food production. Planning for a disease response is driven by many factors.
Original languageEnglish
Pages292
Number of pages1
Publication statusPublished - 2012
Event13th International Symposium on Veterinary Epidemiology and Economics: ISVEE 2012 - Maastricht, Netherlands
Duration: 20 Aug 201225 Aug 2012
https://orbit.dtu.dk/fedora/objects/orbit:123085/datastreams/file_85fd15d8-5f16-4fc5-a125-caddfb9009a9/content

Conference

Conference13th International Symposium on Veterinary Epidemiology and Economics
CountryNetherlands
City Maastricht
Period20/08/1225/08/12
Internet address

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