An update on the status of hydatidosis/echinococcosis in domestic animals, wildlife and humans in Australia

Research output: Book chapter/Published conference paperChapter (peer-reviewed)peer-review

Abstract

Echinococcus granulosus is widespread in wildlife over much of Australia, especially in the eastern side of the country in areas associated with the Great Dividing Range. The predominant transmission pattern is sylvatic, with wildlife acting as a major conduit for infection in domestic livestock, especially cattle, but also sheep and domestic dogs and more rarely humans. Hydatid disease in cattle is the cause of important financial loss to the Australian beef industry, losses to the sheep meat industry are low. Conventional meat inspection methods detect less than one-third of bovine hepatic hydatidosis infections. Cases of infection in humans and domestic dogs are becoming less common. Transmission of hydatid disease to humans in the island state of Tasmania has ceased. Occasional cases of hydatid infection in Tasmanian cattle are seen, mostly in animals imported from the Australian mainland.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationDog Parasites Endangering Human Health
EditorsChristina Strube, Heinz Mehlhorn
Place of PublicationCham, Switzerland
PublisherSpringer
Chapter7
Pages123-140
Number of pages18
Edition1st
ISBN (Electronic)9783030532307
ISBN (Print)9783030532291, 9783030532321
Publication statusPublished - 2021

Publication series

NameParasitology Research Monographs
Volume13
ISSN (Print)2192-3671

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