Antimicrobial stewardship in small animal practice

A pilot trial in Canberra

Alison Taylor, Michael Archinal, Jane Heller, Melanie Latter, Stephen Page

Research output: Other contribution to conferenceAbstract

Abstract

Summary Outline
An antimicrobial stewardship (AMS) pilot trial was initiated in the ACT with the aim of identifying whether clinicians in small animal practice can and will improve their approach to prescribing antimicrobials.
Enrolment in the trial was voluntary. Questionnaires were utilised to quantify individual and practice-based antibiotic usage and attitudes surrounding AMS prior to and at the conclusion of the trial period. The trial consisted of receipt
of a weekly newsletter which provided information specific to AMS (e.g. articles on rational antibiotic use and how to use the AIDAP guidelines), access to an online training program and the provision of interactive educational
workshops that ran every 6 – 8 weeks across the year. These workshops focused on common companion animal medicine issues and integrated teaching about AMS to ensure continued interest from participants.
Excellent uptake of this AMS trial was obtained from clinical veterinarians across Canberra, with 14 of the 24 clinics and 69 individuals signing up to the trial. Results of the questionnaires identified that, while a broad range of confidence with respect to decision-making surrounding antimicrobial usage in clinical practice was present in local veterinarians, the vast majority of participants (86.8%) identified a wish to increase their knowledge to enable
greater confidence. The post-trial practice questionnaire identified a reduction in overall usage in antibiotics by the participating practices by up to 18%.
The results of this pilot study shows that there is an appetite for formalised local AMS training. Our recommendations include utilising face to face education where possible, although improving the online education to ensure that it is able to capture and speak to local issues will also assist for areas where face to face meetings are not possible. Ideally the findings form this pilot study will lead to a more official program which will allow the program to become sustainable and more widely implemented.

Key Antimicrobial Stewardship Message
It is possible to formally support AMS in small animal practice but work is required to identify how best to proceed nationally.
Original languageEnglish
Pages52
Number of pages1
Publication statusPublished - 2018

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Education
Veterinarians
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Pets
Appetite
Decision Making
Teaching
Medicine
Guidelines
Surveys and Questionnaires

Cite this

Taylor, A., Archinal, M., Heller, J., Latter, M., & Page, S. (2018). Antimicrobial stewardship in small animal practice: A pilot trial in Canberra. 52.
Taylor, Alison ; Archinal, Michael ; Heller, Jane ; Latter, Melanie ; Page, Stephen. / Antimicrobial stewardship in small animal practice : A pilot trial in Canberra. 1 p.
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abstract = "Summary OutlineAn antimicrobial stewardship (AMS) pilot trial was initiated in the ACT with the aim of identifying whether clinicians in small animal practice can and will improve their approach to prescribing antimicrobials.Enrolment in the trial was voluntary. Questionnaires were utilised to quantify individual and practice-based antibiotic usage and attitudes surrounding AMS prior to and at the conclusion of the trial period. The trial consisted of receiptof a weekly newsletter which provided information specific to AMS (e.g. articles on rational antibiotic use and how to use the AIDAP guidelines), access to an online training program and the provision of interactive educationalworkshops that ran every 6 – 8 weeks across the year. These workshops focused on common companion animal medicine issues and integrated teaching about AMS to ensure continued interest from participants.Excellent uptake of this AMS trial was obtained from clinical veterinarians across Canberra, with 14 of the 24 clinics and 69 individuals signing up to the trial. Results of the questionnaires identified that, while a broad range of confidence with respect to decision-making surrounding antimicrobial usage in clinical practice was present in local veterinarians, the vast majority of participants (86.8{\%}) identified a wish to increase their knowledge to enablegreater confidence. The post-trial practice questionnaire identified a reduction in overall usage in antibiotics by the participating practices by up to 18{\%}.The results of this pilot study shows that there is an appetite for formalised local AMS training. Our recommendations include utilising face to face education where possible, although improving the online education to ensure that it is able to capture and speak to local issues will also assist for areas where face to face meetings are not possible. Ideally the findings form this pilot study will lead to a more official program which will allow the program to become sustainable and more widely implemented.Key Antimicrobial Stewardship MessageIt is possible to formally support AMS in small animal practice but work is required to identify how best to proceed nationally.",
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Taylor, A, Archinal, M, Heller, J, Latter, M & Page, S 2018, 'Antimicrobial stewardship in small animal practice: A pilot trial in Canberra' pp. 52.

Antimicrobial stewardship in small animal practice : A pilot trial in Canberra. / Taylor, Alison; Archinal, Michael; Heller, Jane; Latter, Melanie; Page, Stephen.

2018. 52.

Research output: Other contribution to conferenceAbstract

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T1 - Antimicrobial stewardship in small animal practice

T2 - A pilot trial in Canberra

AU - Taylor, Alison

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AU - Heller, Jane

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N2 - Summary OutlineAn antimicrobial stewardship (AMS) pilot trial was initiated in the ACT with the aim of identifying whether clinicians in small animal practice can and will improve their approach to prescribing antimicrobials.Enrolment in the trial was voluntary. Questionnaires were utilised to quantify individual and practice-based antibiotic usage and attitudes surrounding AMS prior to and at the conclusion of the trial period. The trial consisted of receiptof a weekly newsletter which provided information specific to AMS (e.g. articles on rational antibiotic use and how to use the AIDAP guidelines), access to an online training program and the provision of interactive educationalworkshops that ran every 6 – 8 weeks across the year. These workshops focused on common companion animal medicine issues and integrated teaching about AMS to ensure continued interest from participants.Excellent uptake of this AMS trial was obtained from clinical veterinarians across Canberra, with 14 of the 24 clinics and 69 individuals signing up to the trial. Results of the questionnaires identified that, while a broad range of confidence with respect to decision-making surrounding antimicrobial usage in clinical practice was present in local veterinarians, the vast majority of participants (86.8%) identified a wish to increase their knowledge to enablegreater confidence. The post-trial practice questionnaire identified a reduction in overall usage in antibiotics by the participating practices by up to 18%.The results of this pilot study shows that there is an appetite for formalised local AMS training. Our recommendations include utilising face to face education where possible, although improving the online education to ensure that it is able to capture and speak to local issues will also assist for areas where face to face meetings are not possible. Ideally the findings form this pilot study will lead to a more official program which will allow the program to become sustainable and more widely implemented.Key Antimicrobial Stewardship MessageIt is possible to formally support AMS in small animal practice but work is required to identify how best to proceed nationally.

AB - Summary OutlineAn antimicrobial stewardship (AMS) pilot trial was initiated in the ACT with the aim of identifying whether clinicians in small animal practice can and will improve their approach to prescribing antimicrobials.Enrolment in the trial was voluntary. Questionnaires were utilised to quantify individual and practice-based antibiotic usage and attitudes surrounding AMS prior to and at the conclusion of the trial period. The trial consisted of receiptof a weekly newsletter which provided information specific to AMS (e.g. articles on rational antibiotic use and how to use the AIDAP guidelines), access to an online training program and the provision of interactive educationalworkshops that ran every 6 – 8 weeks across the year. These workshops focused on common companion animal medicine issues and integrated teaching about AMS to ensure continued interest from participants.Excellent uptake of this AMS trial was obtained from clinical veterinarians across Canberra, with 14 of the 24 clinics and 69 individuals signing up to the trial. Results of the questionnaires identified that, while a broad range of confidence with respect to decision-making surrounding antimicrobial usage in clinical practice was present in local veterinarians, the vast majority of participants (86.8%) identified a wish to increase their knowledge to enablegreater confidence. The post-trial practice questionnaire identified a reduction in overall usage in antibiotics by the participating practices by up to 18%.The results of this pilot study shows that there is an appetite for formalised local AMS training. Our recommendations include utilising face to face education where possible, although improving the online education to ensure that it is able to capture and speak to local issues will also assist for areas where face to face meetings are not possible. Ideally the findings form this pilot study will lead to a more official program which will allow the program to become sustainable and more widely implemented.Key Antimicrobial Stewardship MessageIt is possible to formally support AMS in small animal practice but work is required to identify how best to proceed nationally.

M3 - Abstract

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ER -