Are Arabic curriculum and textbooks adequate? A critical analysis of Arabic teaching in five Islamic primary schools in Sydney

Said Saad Al akloby, Salih Yucel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Arabic is not just the language of the sacred texts of Islam but also the language of a civilization. To Muslims, the importance of Arabic is second only to that of religion. Historically, Muslims who emigrated established institutions for teaching Arabic as a second language. Muslims in Australia have been no exception. This study examined 30 textbooks and curricula of Arabic language education in five Islamic primary schools in Sydney. The findings show that most of the textbooks were designed for native Arabic students and were not relevant to non-native students in Australia. Some textbooks gave no objectives, and those that did so were not clear or achievable. The format and presentation of the textbooks were generally of an acceptable standard, but the content did not address the context or proficiency levels of Muslim Australian students. More than half of the textbooks lacked Islamic vocabulary. Also, four of the schools have no clear curricula. Only one of them has curriculum which is designed according to local students. The findings indicate that such textbooks should be designed locally by Arabic language experts in Australia.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)33-39
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of American Academic Research
Volume6
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 25 Dec 2018

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