Attitudes, drivers of consumption and taste preferences: A focus on Chardonnay

Research output: Other contribution to conferencePresentation only

Abstract

Chardonnay is an important variety to the Australian wine industry and in recent years its popularity amongst consumers has been questioned. Anecdotal explanations for the decline abound, yet little research has been conducted. Using a multi-disciplinary approach, we used qualitative and quantitative methods to determine the reason for any decline in perception. Sensory descriptive analysis confirmed a wide range of flavour styles available in Australia, while preference mapping confirmed that several of the styles were highly liked by consumers; further, all styles had some segments of the market that were ‘followers’, though for the oak-driven style the segment was quite small. While focus groups did point to some negative perceptions about Chardonnay, further experimental and quantitative and qualitative survey work did not. We interpreted the broad range of results from multiple methods as indicating that there was not a negative perception of Chardonnay per se, but that within a peer group situation such as found in focus groups, it had become popular to say negative things about Chardonnay. Our results show that it is time for the industry to start talking positively about the prospects of Chardonnay, especially since the negative perception of Chardonnay reported in focus groups were largely echoed from anecdotal claims found in the popular press. There have been oversupply issues, alongside increased competition from other varieties which need to be taken into account, but our results show a positive future for Australian Chardonnay if flavour styles and size of market segments are taken into account.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 2013
EventAustralian Wine Industry Technical Conference - Sydney, Australia, Australia
Duration: 13 Jul 201318 Jul 2013

Conference

ConferenceAustralian Wine Industry Technical Conference
CountryAustralia
Period13/07/1318/07/13

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focus groups
food choices
flavor
markets
wine industry
peers
qualitative analysis
quantitative analysis
Quercus
industry
methodology

Cite this

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title = "Attitudes, drivers of consumption and taste preferences: A focus on Chardonnay",
abstract = "Chardonnay is an important variety to the Australian wine industry and in recent years its popularity amongst consumers has been questioned. Anecdotal explanations for the decline abound, yet little research has been conducted. Using a multi-disciplinary approach, we used qualitative and quantitative methods to determine the reason for any decline in perception. Sensory descriptive analysis confirmed a wide range of flavour styles available in Australia, while preference mapping confirmed that several of the styles were highly liked by consumers; further, all styles had some segments of the market that were ‘followers’, though for the oak-driven style the segment was quite small. While focus groups did point to some negative perceptions about Chardonnay, further experimental and quantitative and qualitative survey work did not. We interpreted the broad range of results from multiple methods as indicating that there was not a negative perception of Chardonnay per se, but that within a peer group situation such as found in focus groups, it had become popular to say negative things about Chardonnay. Our results show that it is time for the industry to start talking positively about the prospects of Chardonnay, especially since the negative perception of Chardonnay reported in focus groups were largely echoed from anecdotal claims found in the popular press. There have been oversupply issues, alongside increased competition from other varieties which need to be taken into account, but our results show a positive future for Australian Chardonnay if flavour styles and size of market segments are taken into account.",
keywords = "Chardonnay, Wine, Consumer, Attitudes, Drivers, Consumption, Taste preferences",
author = "Anthony Saliba and Jasmine MacDonald and Leigh Schmidtke and John Blackman",
year = "2013",
language = "English",
note = "Australian Wine Industry Technical Conference ; Conference date: 13-07-2013 Through 18-07-2013",

}

Saliba, A, MacDonald, J, Schmidtke, L & Blackman, J 2013, 'Attitudes, drivers of consumption and taste preferences: A focus on Chardonnay' Paper presented at Australian Wine Industry Technical Conference, Australia, 13/07/13 - 18/07/13, .

Attitudes, drivers of consumption and taste preferences: A focus on Chardonnay. / Saliba, Anthony; MacDonald, Jasmine; Schmidtke, Leigh; Blackman, John.

2013. Paper presented at Australian Wine Industry Technical Conference, Australia.

Research output: Other contribution to conferencePresentation only

TY - CONF

T1 - Attitudes, drivers of consumption and taste preferences: A focus on Chardonnay

AU - Saliba, Anthony

AU - MacDonald, Jasmine

AU - Schmidtke, Leigh

AU - Blackman, John

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - Chardonnay is an important variety to the Australian wine industry and in recent years its popularity amongst consumers has been questioned. Anecdotal explanations for the decline abound, yet little research has been conducted. Using a multi-disciplinary approach, we used qualitative and quantitative methods to determine the reason for any decline in perception. Sensory descriptive analysis confirmed a wide range of flavour styles available in Australia, while preference mapping confirmed that several of the styles were highly liked by consumers; further, all styles had some segments of the market that were ‘followers’, though for the oak-driven style the segment was quite small. While focus groups did point to some negative perceptions about Chardonnay, further experimental and quantitative and qualitative survey work did not. We interpreted the broad range of results from multiple methods as indicating that there was not a negative perception of Chardonnay per se, but that within a peer group situation such as found in focus groups, it had become popular to say negative things about Chardonnay. Our results show that it is time for the industry to start talking positively about the prospects of Chardonnay, especially since the negative perception of Chardonnay reported in focus groups were largely echoed from anecdotal claims found in the popular press. There have been oversupply issues, alongside increased competition from other varieties which need to be taken into account, but our results show a positive future for Australian Chardonnay if flavour styles and size of market segments are taken into account.

AB - Chardonnay is an important variety to the Australian wine industry and in recent years its popularity amongst consumers has been questioned. Anecdotal explanations for the decline abound, yet little research has been conducted. Using a multi-disciplinary approach, we used qualitative and quantitative methods to determine the reason for any decline in perception. Sensory descriptive analysis confirmed a wide range of flavour styles available in Australia, while preference mapping confirmed that several of the styles were highly liked by consumers; further, all styles had some segments of the market that were ‘followers’, though for the oak-driven style the segment was quite small. While focus groups did point to some negative perceptions about Chardonnay, further experimental and quantitative and qualitative survey work did not. We interpreted the broad range of results from multiple methods as indicating that there was not a negative perception of Chardonnay per se, but that within a peer group situation such as found in focus groups, it had become popular to say negative things about Chardonnay. Our results show that it is time for the industry to start talking positively about the prospects of Chardonnay, especially since the negative perception of Chardonnay reported in focus groups were largely echoed from anecdotal claims found in the popular press. There have been oversupply issues, alongside increased competition from other varieties which need to be taken into account, but our results show a positive future for Australian Chardonnay if flavour styles and size of market segments are taken into account.

KW - Chardonnay

KW - Wine

KW - Consumer

KW - Attitudes

KW - Drivers

KW - Consumption

KW - Taste preferences

M3 - Presentation only

ER -

Saliba A, MacDonald J, Schmidtke L, Blackman J. Attitudes, drivers of consumption and taste preferences: A focus on Chardonnay. 2013. Paper presented at Australian Wine Industry Technical Conference, Australia.