Attitudes toward learning oral communication skills online: the importance of intrinsic interest and student-instructor differences

K. M. Harris, Liam Phelan, Bonnie McBain, Jennifer Archer, Antony J Drew, Carole James

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined and compared attitudes of both students and instructors, motivated by an interest in improving the development and delivery of online oral communication learning (OOCL). Few studies have compared student and instructor attitudes toward learning technologies, and no known studies have conducted item response theory (IRT) analyses on these factors. Two independent and anonymous surveys resulted in 255 participants (124 university students, and 131 instructors). Exploratory factor analyses produced final item sets and a two-factor model for student attitudes (Technology Self-efficacy [TSE], and Positive Attitudes [PA]), and a three-factor model for instructors (TSE, Behavioral Intentions, and PA). The OOCL attitude factors showed strong validity through both IRT and classical test theory analyses. Comparisons between students and instructors showed students generally had higher TSE and more positive attitudes towards OOCL. The attitudes most relevant to OOCL were intrinsic interest, behavioral intentions, and perceived usefulness of the technology. This study revealed that technological self-efficacy may be useful for differentiating students and instructors, but not for assessing OOCL attitudes. Further development in this field could focus on the improvement of instructors’ attitudes and skills, as well as exploring the role of intrinsic interest. © 2016, Association for Educational Communications and Technology.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)591-609
Number of pages19
JournalEducational Technology Research and Development
Volume64
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01 Mar 2016

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Attitudes toward learning oral communication skills online: the importance of intrinsic interest and student-instructor differences'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this