Babies and big boys: Power, desire and the politics of belonging in early childhood education and care

Tina Stratigos

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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    Abstract

    Belonging is a fundamental human need that impacts young children's everyday experiences and well being in group care. We know little, however, about how belonging works for infants in multi-age settings such as family day care. In this article, I use Sumsion and Wong's three intersecting axes of belonging ' categorisation, performativity, and resistance and desire ' to analyse two segments of video data from a longitudinal case study of belonging for an infant in family day care. I draw on concepts from Deleuze and Guattari, in particular assemblage and desire, to develop understandings of how the axes appeared to be at work and what they meant for the infant's belonging at family day care. I am particularly interested in what an examination of the axes might reveal about the roles infants can play in the politics of belonging in early childhood education and care. The data illustrate the important role played by material aspects of assemblages, the dynamic nature of social categories and the complex roles of desire and power in the politics of belonging for infants.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)268-282
    Number of pages15
    JournalGlobal Studies of Childhood
    Volume6
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2015

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