Baiting and citizen science: A comparative study of BRUVs and eDNA surveys throughout estuaries in New South Wales.

Sebastian Roe, Amina Price, Matt Rees, Jessica Tout-Lyon

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Abstract

The monitoring of fish assemblages is fundamental to fisheries research and Baited Remote Underwater Videos (BRUVs) have traditionally been used as the method of choice for a non-destructive approach to conducting fish surveys. The use of environmental DNA (eDNA) to study fish assemblages is an emerging technique increasing in popularity. The application of eDNA in aquatic ecosystems is revolutionising the detection of biodiversity, and is proving to be a cheaper, quicker, more sensitive and a citizen-science friendly approach. eDNA is proving to be a powerful complementary technique enabling enhanced sampling capacity previously unattainable by scientists alone. Previous research in estuaries demonstrates an increase in fish species richness from eDNA samples when compared to traditional BRUVS surveys. Our research will fill a knowledge gap by expanding the method comparison of detecting fish assemblages using BRUVs and eDNA across multiple estuaries throughout NSW, and the results will inform the design of biomonitoring programs of estuaries in NSW. Furthermore, our work will investigate the latitudinal distribution and potential range shifts of fish assemblages throughout estuaries in NSW. This research will play an important role in demonstrating the importance of involving citizen-scientists in the collection of water samples for eDNA analysis. The integration of citizen-scientists into the collection of samples is fundamental to expanding and developing longitudinal datasets that are required to improve our understanding of the issues facing aquatic ecosystems, how these systems respond to changes and will ultimately inform on ground conservation and management approaches.
Original languageEnglish
Pages533
Number of pages1
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2023
Event11th Indo-Pacific Fish Conference and Annual Conference of the Australian Society for Fish Biology - University of Auckland , Auckland, New Zealand
Duration: 20 Nov 202324 Nov 2023
https://www.ipfc11-asfb.ac.nz/
https://bpb-ap-se2.wpmucdn.com/blogs.auckland.ac.nz/dist/9/608/files/2023/11/HANDBOOK.pdf (Conference handbook)

Conference

Conference11th Indo-Pacific Fish Conference and Annual Conference of the Australian Society for Fish Biology
Abbreviated titleFish and fisheries research
Country/TerritoryNew Zealand
CityAuckland
Period20/11/2324/11/23
OtherWe look forward to welcoming you to the University of Auckland, located in the heart of Auckland city. We invite you to come and meet the people that live and work here, explore our beautiful city and hope that you leave with lasting friends, partnerships and memories.

The Organising Committee look forward to welcoming you to the 11th Indo-Pacific Fish Conference (IPFC) and Annual Conference of the Australian Society for Fish Biology, to be held 20-24 November 2023 at the University of Auckland, New Zealand.

The Indo-Pacific Fish Conference (IPFC), held every four years, is undoubtedly one of the world’s premier ichthyological conferences and is eagerly anticipated by marine, estuarine and freshwater fish enthusiasts alike.

The Australian Society for Fish Biology (ASFB), founded in 1971, aims to promote research, education and management of fish and fisheries across the Indo-Pacific.

We are excited to bring these two conference together in a joint meeting that will reflect the extraordinary biological, environmental and cultural diversity of the vast Indo-Pacific region.
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