Beak and feather disease virus genotypes in Australian parrots reveal flexible host-switching

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To discover beak and feather disease virus (BFDV) genotypes in Australian parrots that might threaten vulnerable and endangered psittacine bird species. Methods: Phylogenetic analyses of new DNA sequence data from Australian birds including the Rep gene (n=55) and nine whole genomes, were compared with all available published BFDV genomes to assess host- and geographically-based divergence as well as probable host-switch events. Results: Strong support for flexible host-switching and recombination was detected, indicating active cross-species transmission in various subpopulations. Conclusion: The data suggested that all endangered Australian psittacine bird species are equally likely to be infected by BFDV genotypes from any other close or distantly related host reservoir species.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)471-475
Number of pages5
JournalAustralian Veterinary Journal
Volume93
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2015

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Beak and feather disease virus
Circovirus
Parrots
parrots
Psittaciformes
Birds
Genotype
genotype
birds
Genome
disease reservoirs
genome
DNA Sequence Analysis
Genetic Recombination
nucleotide sequences
phylogeny
Genes
genes
methodology

Grant Number

  • FT120100242

Cite this

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title = "Beak and feather disease virus genotypes in Australian parrots reveal flexible host-switching",
abstract = "Objective: To discover beak and feather disease virus (BFDV) genotypes in Australian parrots that might threaten vulnerable and endangered psittacine bird species. Methods: Phylogenetic analyses of new DNA sequence data from Australian birds including the Rep gene (n=55) and nine whole genomes, were compared with all available published BFDV genomes to assess host- and geographically-based divergence as well as probable host-switch events. Results: Strong support for flexible host-switching and recombination was detected, indicating active cross-species transmission in various subpopulations. Conclusion: The data suggested that all endangered Australian psittacine bird species are equally likely to be infected by BFDV genotypes from any other close or distantly related host reservoir species.",
keywords = "Birds, Circovirus, Host generalism, Key threatening process, Psittacine beak and feather disease, Viral quasispecies, Viral recombination",
author = "Subir Sarker and Jade Forwood and Seyed Ghorashi and Andrew Peters and Shane Raidal",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Beak and feather disease virus genotypes in Australian parrots reveal flexible host-switching

AU - Sarker, Subir

AU - Forwood, Jade

AU - Ghorashi, Seyed

AU - Peters, Andrew

AU - Raidal, Shane

N1 - Includes bibliographical references.

PY - 2015/12

Y1 - 2015/12

N2 - Objective: To discover beak and feather disease virus (BFDV) genotypes in Australian parrots that might threaten vulnerable and endangered psittacine bird species. Methods: Phylogenetic analyses of new DNA sequence data from Australian birds including the Rep gene (n=55) and nine whole genomes, were compared with all available published BFDV genomes to assess host- and geographically-based divergence as well as probable host-switch events. Results: Strong support for flexible host-switching and recombination was detected, indicating active cross-species transmission in various subpopulations. Conclusion: The data suggested that all endangered Australian psittacine bird species are equally likely to be infected by BFDV genotypes from any other close or distantly related host reservoir species.

AB - Objective: To discover beak and feather disease virus (BFDV) genotypes in Australian parrots that might threaten vulnerable and endangered psittacine bird species. Methods: Phylogenetic analyses of new DNA sequence data from Australian birds including the Rep gene (n=55) and nine whole genomes, were compared with all available published BFDV genomes to assess host- and geographically-based divergence as well as probable host-switch events. Results: Strong support for flexible host-switching and recombination was detected, indicating active cross-species transmission in various subpopulations. Conclusion: The data suggested that all endangered Australian psittacine bird species are equally likely to be infected by BFDV genotypes from any other close or distantly related host reservoir species.

KW - Birds

KW - Circovirus

KW - Host generalism

KW - Key threatening process

KW - Psittacine beak and feather disease

KW - Viral quasispecies

KW - Viral recombination

U2 - 10.1111/avj.12389

DO - 10.1111/avj.12389

M3 - Article

VL - 93

SP - 471

EP - 475

JO - Australian Veterinary Journal

JF - Australian Veterinary Journal

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