Benefit Finding in Parental Cancer: Types and Predictors of Benefits and their Influence on Depression and Well-being

Janelle V. Levesque

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

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Abstract

The negative themes reflected the emotional impact of cancer, grief and loss, and involvement in caregiving. Preparation for Study Two revealed no measures available to adequately assess the experience of parental cancer for adult children. As a result, a Parental Cancer Questionnaire (PCQ) was developed to reflect both positive and negative experiences of parental cancer for adult offspring. A quantitative survey of 311 adults, whose parents had cancer, then examined the participants' experience, and their psychological outcomes. Initial analyses determined the component structure and reliability of the newlydeveloped PCQ, finding it to be a reliable, three-factor scale, measuring parental cancer benefits, emotional experiences, and caregiver strain. Study Two confirmed that benefit finding occurs in adults whose parents have cancer, particularly in the area of family. The predictors of benefit finding were emotional experiences, carer satisfactions, and outcome of parental cancer. Benefit finding was a significant negative predictor of depression; however, it had no relationship to anxiety, stress, or well-being. The findings of the thesis are then illustrated in light of the theoretical and empirical literature, and are discussed in terms of the new knowledgegenerated from these studies. The thesis also highlights key clinical considerations regarding how best to incorporate the concept of benefit finding into clinical interventions. The thesis also developed the PCQ, a scale with potentially wide clinical and research utility that is specific to the cancer experience. The development of the PCQ addresses a clear gap in the assessment literature. Limitations of the thesis are also outlined. Overall, the findings are important, because they make an initial step to develop thescant knowledge regarding the adult experience of parental cancer.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
Awarding Institution
  • Charles Sturt University
Supervisors/Advisors
  • Maybery, Darryl, Principal Supervisor
  • Patrick, Kent, Co-Supervisor
  • Chittleborough, Phillip , Co-Supervisor, External person
  • Moran, Carmen, Co-Supervisor
Award date18 Aug 2011
Place of PublicationAustralia
Publisher
Publication statusPublished - 2012

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Depression
Neoplasms
Adult Children
Caregivers
Parents
Grief
Anxiety
Surveys and Questionnaires
Psychology
Research

Cite this

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title = "Benefit Finding in Parental Cancer: Types and Predictors of Benefits and their Influence on Depression and Well-being",
abstract = "The negative themes reflected the emotional impact of cancer, grief and loss, and involvement in caregiving. Preparation for Study Two revealed no measures available to adequately assess the experience of parental cancer for adult children. As a result, a Parental Cancer Questionnaire (PCQ) was developed to reflect both positive and negative experiences of parental cancer for adult offspring. A quantitative survey of 311 adults, whose parents had cancer, then examined the participants' experience, and their psychological outcomes. Initial analyses determined the component structure and reliability of the newlydeveloped PCQ, finding it to be a reliable, three-factor scale, measuring parental cancer benefits, emotional experiences, and caregiver strain. Study Two confirmed that benefit finding occurs in adults whose parents have cancer, particularly in the area of family. The predictors of benefit finding were emotional experiences, carer satisfactions, and outcome of parental cancer. Benefit finding was a significant negative predictor of depression; however, it had no relationship to anxiety, stress, or well-being. The findings of the thesis are then illustrated in light of the theoretical and empirical literature, and are discussed in terms of the new knowledgegenerated from these studies. The thesis also highlights key clinical considerations regarding how best to incorporate the concept of benefit finding into clinical interventions. The thesis also developed the PCQ, a scale with potentially wide clinical and research utility that is specific to the cancer experience. The development of the PCQ addresses a clear gap in the assessment literature. Limitations of the thesis are also outlined. Overall, the findings are important, because they make an initial step to develop thescant knowledge regarding the adult experience of parental cancer.",
author = "Levesque, {Janelle V.}",
year = "2012",
language = "English",
publisher = "Charles Sturt University",
address = "Australia",
school = "Charles Sturt University",

}

Levesque, JV 2012, 'Benefit Finding in Parental Cancer: Types and Predictors of Benefits and their Influence on Depression and Well-being', Doctor of Philosophy, Charles Sturt University, Australia.

Benefit Finding in Parental Cancer : Types and Predictors of Benefits and their Influence on Depression and Well-being. / Levesque, Janelle V.

Australia : Charles Sturt University, 2012. 425 p.

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

TY - THES

T1 - Benefit Finding in Parental Cancer

T2 - Types and Predictors of Benefits and their Influence on Depression and Well-being

AU - Levesque, Janelle V.

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - The negative themes reflected the emotional impact of cancer, grief and loss, and involvement in caregiving. Preparation for Study Two revealed no measures available to adequately assess the experience of parental cancer for adult children. As a result, a Parental Cancer Questionnaire (PCQ) was developed to reflect both positive and negative experiences of parental cancer for adult offspring. A quantitative survey of 311 adults, whose parents had cancer, then examined the participants' experience, and their psychological outcomes. Initial analyses determined the component structure and reliability of the newlydeveloped PCQ, finding it to be a reliable, three-factor scale, measuring parental cancer benefits, emotional experiences, and caregiver strain. Study Two confirmed that benefit finding occurs in adults whose parents have cancer, particularly in the area of family. The predictors of benefit finding were emotional experiences, carer satisfactions, and outcome of parental cancer. Benefit finding was a significant negative predictor of depression; however, it had no relationship to anxiety, stress, or well-being. The findings of the thesis are then illustrated in light of the theoretical and empirical literature, and are discussed in terms of the new knowledgegenerated from these studies. The thesis also highlights key clinical considerations regarding how best to incorporate the concept of benefit finding into clinical interventions. The thesis also developed the PCQ, a scale with potentially wide clinical and research utility that is specific to the cancer experience. The development of the PCQ addresses a clear gap in the assessment literature. Limitations of the thesis are also outlined. Overall, the findings are important, because they make an initial step to develop thescant knowledge regarding the adult experience of parental cancer.

AB - The negative themes reflected the emotional impact of cancer, grief and loss, and involvement in caregiving. Preparation for Study Two revealed no measures available to adequately assess the experience of parental cancer for adult children. As a result, a Parental Cancer Questionnaire (PCQ) was developed to reflect both positive and negative experiences of parental cancer for adult offspring. A quantitative survey of 311 adults, whose parents had cancer, then examined the participants' experience, and their psychological outcomes. Initial analyses determined the component structure and reliability of the newlydeveloped PCQ, finding it to be a reliable, three-factor scale, measuring parental cancer benefits, emotional experiences, and caregiver strain. Study Two confirmed that benefit finding occurs in adults whose parents have cancer, particularly in the area of family. The predictors of benefit finding were emotional experiences, carer satisfactions, and outcome of parental cancer. Benefit finding was a significant negative predictor of depression; however, it had no relationship to anxiety, stress, or well-being. The findings of the thesis are then illustrated in light of the theoretical and empirical literature, and are discussed in terms of the new knowledgegenerated from these studies. The thesis also highlights key clinical considerations regarding how best to incorporate the concept of benefit finding into clinical interventions. The thesis also developed the PCQ, a scale with potentially wide clinical and research utility that is specific to the cancer experience. The development of the PCQ addresses a clear gap in the assessment literature. Limitations of the thesis are also outlined. Overall, the findings are important, because they make an initial step to develop thescant knowledge regarding the adult experience of parental cancer.

M3 - Doctoral Thesis

PB - Charles Sturt University

CY - Australia

ER -