Biology and biocontrol of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de bary in oilseed Brassicas

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Abstract

Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de Bary is a necrotrophic plant pathogen infecting over 500 host species including oilseed Brassicas. The fungus forms sclerotia which are the asexual resting structures that can survive in the soil for several years and infect host plants by producing ascospores or mycelium. Therefore, disease management is difficult due to the long term survivability of sclerotia. Biological control with antagonistic fungi, including Coniothyrium minitans and Trichoderma spp, has been reported, however, efficacy of these mycoparasites is not consistent in the field. In contrast, a number of bacterial species, such as Pseudomonas and Bacillus display potential antagonism against S. sclerotiorum. More recently, the sclerotia-inhabiting strain Bacillus cereus SC-1, demonstrated potential in reducing stem rot disease incidence of canola both in controlled and natural field conditions via antibiosis. Therefore, biocontrol agents based on bacteria could pave the way for sustainable management of S. sclerotiorum in oilseed cropping systems.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-14
Number of pages14
JournalAustralian Plant Pathology Society Newsletter
Volume45
Issue number1
Early online date2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2016

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sclerotia
Sclerotinia sclerotiorum
oilseeds
Brassica
biological control
Biological Sciences
Coniothyrium minitans
mycoparasites
stem rot
fungi
antibiosis
Bacillus (bacteria)
Trichoderma
ascospores
Bacillus cereus
canola
plant pathogens
disease incidence
Pseudomonas
mycelium

Cite this

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title = "Biology and biocontrol of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de bary in oilseed Brassicas",
abstract = "Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de Bary is a necrotrophic plant pathogen infecting over 500 host species including oilseed Brassicas. The fungus forms sclerotia which are the asexual resting structures that can survive in the soil for several years and infect host plants by producing ascospores or mycelium. Therefore, disease management is difficult due to the long term survivability of sclerotia. Biological control with antagonistic fungi, including Coniothyrium minitans and Trichoderma spp, has been reported, however, efficacy of these mycoparasites is not consistent in the field. In contrast, a number of bacterial species, such as Pseudomonas and Bacillus display potential antagonism against S. sclerotiorum. More recently, the sclerotia-inhabiting strain Bacillus cereus SC-1, demonstrated potential in reducing stem rot disease incidence of canola both in controlled and natural field conditions via antibiosis. Therefore, biocontrol agents based on bacteria could pave the way for sustainable management of S. sclerotiorum in oilseed cropping systems.",
keywords = "Biocontrol, Biology, Brassica, Oilseed, Sclerotinia",
author = "Kamal, {Mohd. Mostofa} and Sandra Savocchia and Kurt Lindbeck and Gavin Ash",
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year = "2016",
month = "2",
doi = "10.1007/s13313-015-0391-2",
language = "English",
volume = "45",
pages = "1--14",
journal = "Australasian Plant Pathology",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Biology and biocontrol of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de bary in oilseed Brassicas

AU - Kamal, Mohd. Mostofa

AU - Savocchia, Sandra

AU - Lindbeck, Kurt

AU - Ash, Gavin

N1 - Includes bibliographical references.

PY - 2016/2

Y1 - 2016/2

N2 - Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de Bary is a necrotrophic plant pathogen infecting over 500 host species including oilseed Brassicas. The fungus forms sclerotia which are the asexual resting structures that can survive in the soil for several years and infect host plants by producing ascospores or mycelium. Therefore, disease management is difficult due to the long term survivability of sclerotia. Biological control with antagonistic fungi, including Coniothyrium minitans and Trichoderma spp, has been reported, however, efficacy of these mycoparasites is not consistent in the field. In contrast, a number of bacterial species, such as Pseudomonas and Bacillus display potential antagonism against S. sclerotiorum. More recently, the sclerotia-inhabiting strain Bacillus cereus SC-1, demonstrated potential in reducing stem rot disease incidence of canola both in controlled and natural field conditions via antibiosis. Therefore, biocontrol agents based on bacteria could pave the way for sustainable management of S. sclerotiorum in oilseed cropping systems.

AB - Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de Bary is a necrotrophic plant pathogen infecting over 500 host species including oilseed Brassicas. The fungus forms sclerotia which are the asexual resting structures that can survive in the soil for several years and infect host plants by producing ascospores or mycelium. Therefore, disease management is difficult due to the long term survivability of sclerotia. Biological control with antagonistic fungi, including Coniothyrium minitans and Trichoderma spp, has been reported, however, efficacy of these mycoparasites is not consistent in the field. In contrast, a number of bacterial species, such as Pseudomonas and Bacillus display potential antagonism against S. sclerotiorum. More recently, the sclerotia-inhabiting strain Bacillus cereus SC-1, demonstrated potential in reducing stem rot disease incidence of canola both in controlled and natural field conditions via antibiosis. Therefore, biocontrol agents based on bacteria could pave the way for sustainable management of S. sclerotiorum in oilseed cropping systems.

KW - Biocontrol

KW - Biology

KW - Brassica

KW - Oilseed

KW - Sclerotinia

U2 - 10.1007/s13313-015-0391-2

DO - 10.1007/s13313-015-0391-2

M3 - Article

VL - 45

SP - 1

EP - 14

JO - Australasian Plant Pathology

JF - Australasian Plant Pathology

SN - 0815-3191

IS - 1

ER -