Biosecurity practices and the management of emergency animal diseases among beef producers in Australia

Marta Hernandez-Jover, Vaughan Higgins, Melanie Bryant, Luzia Rast, Connar McShane

Research output: Other contribution to conferenceAbstract

Abstract

Purpose: Prevention of emergency animal diseases (EAD) in Australia relies on strict offshore and border measures and disease surveillance and control programs onshore. Producers are crucial for disease control; however, there is limited information on producers’ awareness of disease risks and their management practices. The aims of this study were to investigate how beef producers in Australia manage EADs risks and to explore knowledge transfer strategies for biosecurity and EAD prevention.
Methods: To achieve these aims face-to-face interviews with government and industry stakeholders (n=18) and a cross-sectional study among beef producers, using a postal survey (n = 182) and face-to-face interviews (n = 34), were conducted.
Results: Findings indicate that animal health system stakeholders have clearly defined responsibilities in biosecurity and EAD prevention and management. However, producers are uncertain about these roles, which can affect their willingness and trust to report animal disease and confusion about EAD management. Producers are aware of the sources of animal disease risk and prioritise herd health. However, EAD and biosecurity planning are a low priority as they perceive EAD events unlikely to occur. In addition, only moderate implementation of biosecurity practices, such as isolating incoming animals or keeping visitors’ records, was reported. Furthermore, over 40% of producers had minimal knowledge of the meaning of EAD, with over 20% reporting no veterinary contact in the last five years and an additional 8.5% who had never contacted a veterinarian. In the event of an unusual disease, most producers would contact their private or government veterinarian; however, most would also treat themselves and some would do nothing and wait.
Conclusions and relevance: Results from this study suggest that there is a need for better coordination between stakeholders to encourage a shared biosecurity and EAD understanding and to communicate a consistent message to producers. The study also highlights the need for improving producer awareness of the importance of EAD prevention and biosecurity practices as well as the stakeholders’ roles within the animal health system.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 2015
Event14th Conference of the International Society for Veterinary Epidemiology and Economics (ISVEE 2015) - Merida, Yucatan, Mexico
Duration: 03 Nov 201507 Nov 2015
https://web.archive.org/web/20160114165105/http://isvee2015.org/

Conference

Conference14th Conference of the International Society for Veterinary Epidemiology and Economics (ISVEE 2015)
Abbreviated titleVeterinary Epidemiology and Economics: Planning Our Future
CountryMexico
CityYucatan
Period03/11/1507/11/15
Internet address

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Animal Diseases
Practice Management
Emergencies
Veterinarians
Disease Management
Border Disease
Health
Red Meat
Interviews
Risk Management
Industry
Cross-Sectional Studies

Cite this

Hernandez-Jover, M., Higgins, V., Bryant, M., Rast, L., & McShane, C. (2015). Biosecurity practices and the management of emergency animal diseases among beef producers in Australia. Abstract from 14th Conference of the International Society for Veterinary Epidemiology and Economics (ISVEE 2015), Yucatan, Mexico.
Hernandez-Jover, Marta ; Higgins, Vaughan ; Bryant, Melanie ; Rast, Luzia ; McShane, Connar. / Biosecurity practices and the management of emergency animal diseases among beef producers in Australia. Abstract from 14th Conference of the International Society for Veterinary Epidemiology and Economics (ISVEE 2015), Yucatan, Mexico.
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abstract = "Purpose: Prevention of emergency animal diseases (EAD) in Australia relies on strict offshore and border measures and disease surveillance and control programs onshore. Producers are crucial for disease control; however, there is limited information on producers’ awareness of disease risks and their management practices. The aims of this study were to investigate how beef producers in Australia manage EADs risks and to explore knowledge transfer strategies for biosecurity and EAD prevention. Methods: To achieve these aims face-to-face interviews with government and industry stakeholders (n=18) and a cross-sectional study among beef producers, using a postal survey (n = 182) and face-to-face interviews (n = 34), were conducted. Results: Findings indicate that animal health system stakeholders have clearly defined responsibilities in biosecurity and EAD prevention and management. However, producers are uncertain about these roles, which can affect their willingness and trust to report animal disease and confusion about EAD management. Producers are aware of the sources of animal disease risk and prioritise herd health. However, EAD and biosecurity planning are a low priority as they perceive EAD events unlikely to occur. In addition, only moderate implementation of biosecurity practices, such as isolating incoming animals or keeping visitors’ records, was reported. Furthermore, over 40{\%} of producers had minimal knowledge of the meaning of EAD, with over 20{\%} reporting no veterinary contact in the last five years and an additional 8.5{\%} who had never contacted a veterinarian. In the event of an unusual disease, most producers would contact their private or government veterinarian; however, most would also treat themselves and some would do nothing and wait. Conclusions and relevance: Results from this study suggest that there is a need for better coordination between stakeholders to encourage a shared biosecurity and EAD understanding and to communicate a consistent message to producers. The study also highlights the need for improving producer awareness of the importance of EAD prevention and biosecurity practices as well as the stakeholders’ roles within the animal health system.",
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Hernandez-Jover, M, Higgins, V, Bryant, M, Rast, L & McShane, C 2015, 'Biosecurity practices and the management of emergency animal diseases among beef producers in Australia' 14th Conference of the International Society for Veterinary Epidemiology and Economics (ISVEE 2015), Yucatan, Mexico, 03/11/15 - 07/11/15, .

Biosecurity practices and the management of emergency animal diseases among beef producers in Australia. / Hernandez-Jover, Marta; Higgins, Vaughan; Bryant, Melanie; Rast, Luzia; McShane, Connar.

2015. Abstract from 14th Conference of the International Society for Veterinary Epidemiology and Economics (ISVEE 2015), Yucatan, Mexico.

Research output: Other contribution to conferenceAbstract

TY - CONF

T1 - Biosecurity practices and the management of emergency animal diseases among beef producers in Australia

AU - Hernandez-Jover, Marta

AU - Higgins, Vaughan

AU - Bryant, Melanie

AU - Rast, Luzia

AU - McShane, Connar

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - Purpose: Prevention of emergency animal diseases (EAD) in Australia relies on strict offshore and border measures and disease surveillance and control programs onshore. Producers are crucial for disease control; however, there is limited information on producers’ awareness of disease risks and their management practices. The aims of this study were to investigate how beef producers in Australia manage EADs risks and to explore knowledge transfer strategies for biosecurity and EAD prevention. Methods: To achieve these aims face-to-face interviews with government and industry stakeholders (n=18) and a cross-sectional study among beef producers, using a postal survey (n = 182) and face-to-face interviews (n = 34), were conducted. Results: Findings indicate that animal health system stakeholders have clearly defined responsibilities in biosecurity and EAD prevention and management. However, producers are uncertain about these roles, which can affect their willingness and trust to report animal disease and confusion about EAD management. Producers are aware of the sources of animal disease risk and prioritise herd health. However, EAD and biosecurity planning are a low priority as they perceive EAD events unlikely to occur. In addition, only moderate implementation of biosecurity practices, such as isolating incoming animals or keeping visitors’ records, was reported. Furthermore, over 40% of producers had minimal knowledge of the meaning of EAD, with over 20% reporting no veterinary contact in the last five years and an additional 8.5% who had never contacted a veterinarian. In the event of an unusual disease, most producers would contact their private or government veterinarian; however, most would also treat themselves and some would do nothing and wait. Conclusions and relevance: Results from this study suggest that there is a need for better coordination between stakeholders to encourage a shared biosecurity and EAD understanding and to communicate a consistent message to producers. The study also highlights the need for improving producer awareness of the importance of EAD prevention and biosecurity practices as well as the stakeholders’ roles within the animal health system.

AB - Purpose: Prevention of emergency animal diseases (EAD) in Australia relies on strict offshore and border measures and disease surveillance and control programs onshore. Producers are crucial for disease control; however, there is limited information on producers’ awareness of disease risks and their management practices. The aims of this study were to investigate how beef producers in Australia manage EADs risks and to explore knowledge transfer strategies for biosecurity and EAD prevention. Methods: To achieve these aims face-to-face interviews with government and industry stakeholders (n=18) and a cross-sectional study among beef producers, using a postal survey (n = 182) and face-to-face interviews (n = 34), were conducted. Results: Findings indicate that animal health system stakeholders have clearly defined responsibilities in biosecurity and EAD prevention and management. However, producers are uncertain about these roles, which can affect their willingness and trust to report animal disease and confusion about EAD management. Producers are aware of the sources of animal disease risk and prioritise herd health. However, EAD and biosecurity planning are a low priority as they perceive EAD events unlikely to occur. In addition, only moderate implementation of biosecurity practices, such as isolating incoming animals or keeping visitors’ records, was reported. Furthermore, over 40% of producers had minimal knowledge of the meaning of EAD, with over 20% reporting no veterinary contact in the last five years and an additional 8.5% who had never contacted a veterinarian. In the event of an unusual disease, most producers would contact their private or government veterinarian; however, most would also treat themselves and some would do nothing and wait. Conclusions and relevance: Results from this study suggest that there is a need for better coordination between stakeholders to encourage a shared biosecurity and EAD understanding and to communicate a consistent message to producers. The study also highlights the need for improving producer awareness of the importance of EAD prevention and biosecurity practices as well as the stakeholders’ roles within the animal health system.

M3 - Abstract

ER -

Hernandez-Jover M, Higgins V, Bryant M, Rast L, McShane C. Biosecurity practices and the management of emergency animal diseases among beef producers in Australia. 2015. Abstract from 14th Conference of the International Society for Veterinary Epidemiology and Economics (ISVEE 2015), Yucatan, Mexico.