'Boiler plating’ in fire management plans: Is command and control planning failing cultural heritage protection?

Research output: Book/ReportOther report

16 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Modern humans approach hazards such as flood and wildfire through ‘planning’, a rational (i.e. knowledge based) activity focused on making decisions to achieve future desired outcomes. This research examined draft Bush Fire Risk Management Plans (FMPs) from the Australian state of NSW to determine the extent to which local knowledge of cultural and environmental assets is reflected in the plan content. The results suggest high levels of copied content, or ‘boiler plating’. This included text copied from another source, cutting and pasting of ‘example’ non generic text, and copying from another FMP or the central generic example plan. While the State planning process pays lip service to the inclusion of local information the practice of boiler plating may produce locally irrelevant and inadequate plans. Disaster planners could consider using more participatory planning approaches to provide the local input needed to protect cultural and
environmental assets and the people who value them.
Original languageEnglish
Place of PublicationAlbury, NSW, Australia
PublisherInstitute for Land, Water and Society Charles Sturt University
Number of pages16
Volume135
ISBN (Electronic)9781864673692
Publication statusPublished - 20 Jan 2020

Publication series

NameInstitute for Land, Water and Society Report
PublisherInstitute for Land, Water and Society

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of ''Boiler plating’ in fire management plans: Is command and control planning failing cultural heritage protection?'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this