Building positive relationships with indigenous children, families and communities: Learning at the cultural interface

Emma Kearney, Leonie McIntosh, Bob Perry, Susan Dockett, Kathleen Clayton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)
47 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Drawing on the work of Martin Nakata, this paper brings into focus the everyday complexities involved in the cultural interfaces that educators, both Indigenous and non-Indigenous, negotiate in order to promote children’s engagement with formal education processes. Analysis of emergent data from a recent evaluation of a preschool education programme operating in 35 rural and remote Indigenous communities in Queensland, Australia, revealed that educators struggle to situate their own knowledge and experiences in relation to the knowledge and experiences of others in both the educational and cultural contexts in which they work. A series of composite vignettes reporting the experiences of early childhood educators across these communities is used to examine the pedagogical opportunities available to educators when they are able to recognise the value of the knowledge and experience of all those involved in a child’s educational success.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)338-352
Number of pages15
JournalCritical Studies in Education
Volume55
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2014

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Building positive relationships with indigenous children, families and communities: Learning at the cultural interface'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this