Can a Scheduled 15-minute School Nurse Appointment Influence Youth Health? Evaluation from an Enhanced School Health Service

Lindsay Smith, Julia Taylor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Tasmania has unique adolescent health needs and often poorer adolescent health outcomes compared to other Australian states and territories. A major contributor to this is the challenge of providing an equitable healthcare service accessible and acceptable to the group. Adolescence is a time when independence in healthcare is evolving and innovative healthcare services are required to improve health and wellbeing outcomes. Schools are a place where confidential and effective primary care can be delivered to adolescents (Langford et.al. 2014; Mukoma & Flisher 2004). In Tasmania in 2012, a ‘Nurse on Campus’ school health service was in operation in only a small number of secondary schools and colleges. The model of service delivery involved a nurse being available to students for ‘drop-in’ one on one appointments as needed. This program was dependent on adolescent initiation through student self-referral or referral from another source. In 2012, an innovative ‘Nurse on Campus’ pilot project was implemented. In this enhanced school health service students at a rural high school were allocated one fifteen-minute appointment with the school nurse regardless of perceived need. In addition, students were still able to access longer appointments and initiate self-referrals to the service when required as per the currently available ‘Nurse on Campus’ school health service.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)55-65
Number of pages10
Journal Developing Practice: The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal
Volume42
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2015

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