Can the general theory of crime and general strain theory explain cyberbullying perpetration?

Helen Lianos, Andrew McGrath

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)
1335 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Cyberbullying is an increasingly common characteristic of contemporary online communication. The current study surveyed 320 Internet-active young adults and found up to 80% reported engaging in this behavior at least once. In addition, the ability of the general theory of crime and general strain theory to explain cyberbullying perpetration was tested. Evidence for both theories was observed, with both low self-control and higher levels of strain related to cyberbullying perpetration. Furthermore, opportunity (operationalized as moderate and high number of hours online) interacted with low self-control to increase perpetration, and anger partially mediated the relationship between strain and cyberbullying. Implications of the findings are discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)674-700
JournalCrime and Delinquency
Volume64
Issue number5
Early online dateJun 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

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Bullying
Crime
self-control
offense
anger
Aptitude
young adult
Anger
Internet
Young Adult
communication
Communication
ability
evidence
Self-Control

Cite this

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Can the general theory of crime and general strain theory explain cyberbullying perpetration? / Lianos, Helen; McGrath, Andrew.

In: Crime and Delinquency, Vol. 64, No. 5, 2018, p. 674-700.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Can the general theory of crime and general strain theory explain cyberbullying perpetration?

AU - Lianos, Helen

AU - McGrath, Andrew

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AB - Cyberbullying is an increasingly common characteristic of contemporary online communication. The current study surveyed 320 Internet-active young adults and found up to 80% reported engaging in this behavior at least once. In addition, the ability of the general theory of crime and general strain theory to explain cyberbullying perpetration was tested. Evidence for both theories was observed, with both low self-control and higher levels of strain related to cyberbullying perpetration. Furthermore, opportunity (operationalized as moderate and high number of hours online) interacted with low self-control to increase perpetration, and anger partially mediated the relationship between strain and cyberbullying. Implications of the findings are discussed.

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