Can the use of Australian cardoon (Cynara cardunculus L.) coagulant overcome the quality problems associated with cheese made from ultrafiltered milk?

Samson Agboola, Hwa Chan, Jian Zhao, Ata-Ur Rehman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)
16 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Concentrated cow's milk, obtained by either limited ultrafiltration to arrive at a concentration factor of 1.4x (UF) or by mixing 4x UF milk with regular milk (MX) was used to manufacture cheeses coagulated with calf rennet or aqueous extract from Cynara cardunculus L. (cardoon). The manufactured cheeses were tested and compared with those made from regular milk for chemical and sensory properties, yield, textural and biochemical indices over a 60-day ripening period. There was no significant difference (P > 0.05) in the chemical properties with the type of coagulant but in general, a lower yield and greater bitterness was observed in the cheeses made using cardoon, while ultrafiltration led to reduced casein hydrolysis, less bitterness and harder, more crumbly cheeses irrespective of coagulant type. The MX process was successful in reducing the textural problems which occurred in cheese made with UF milk alone. The ultrafiltration process itself was apparently detrimental to the textural quality of cheeses, rather than the associated increase in concentration.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1352-1359
Number of pages8
JournalLWT - Food Science and Technology
Volume42
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2009

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