Causal factors influencing the current incidence of weed seed contamination in sheep carcasses across Australia

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Abstract

Grass seed contamination of sheep carcasses and skins result in significant costs to the Australian and New Zealand sheep meat value chains. Hordeum spp. (barley grass) and Bromus spp. (brome grass) are key weed species associated with carcass contamination in Australia. As the invasive range of these species now includes much of southern Australia, both species present significant challenges for the maintenance of quality standards in Australian sheep meat products sold into global markets such as Asia (China), the Middle East, the European Union and the United States. Previous examination of Australian abattoir data (2006-2012), along with recent weed distribution patterns, suggests carcass contamination is currently associated with rainfall and infestation patterns of key annual grass weeds, although it is likely a number of other factors are also contributing to incidence. A full analysis of Australian abattoir datasets (2009-2014), in combination with regional climate data, was undertaken to evaluate critical factors associated with seed contamination across southern Australia. Significant differences in seed contamination in slaughtered sheep were associated with state, region, animal sex and age. Seed contamination was also positively associated with the distribution of Bromus spp. and Hordeum spp. Mean monthly rainfall, elevation and abattoir effects were significant, as were interactions between mean monthly temperature and state, as well as elevation and year. Results suggest the need for effective management of annual grass weeds contributing to seed contamination of Australian sheep meat products, in the context of treatment efficacy and profitability associated with implementation of integrated control options.
Original languageEnglish
JournalWeed Research
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 31 Mar 2019

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ovine carcasses
sheep meat
sheep
Bromus
weed
weeds
slaughterhouses
seed
incidence
Hordeum
grass weeds
annual weeds
grass
seeds
meat products
meat
grasses
rain
grass seed
Middle East

Cite this

@article{d4778dc9d2c94c44a3e90c099353da46,
title = "Causal factors influencing the current incidence of weed seed contamination in sheep carcasses across Australia",
abstract = "Grass seed contamination of sheep carcasses and skins result in significant costs to the Australian and New Zealand sheep meat value chains. Hordeum spp. (barley grass) and Bromus spp. (brome grass) are key weed species associated with carcass contamination in Australia. As the invasive range of these species now includes much of southern Australia, both species present significant challenges for the maintenance of quality standards in Australian sheep meat products sold into global markets such as Asia (China), the Middle East, the European Union and the United States. Previous examination of Australian abattoir data (2006-2012), along with recent weed distribution patterns, suggests carcass contamination is currently associated with rainfall and infestation patterns of key annual grass weeds, although it is likely a number of other factors are also contributing to incidence. A full analysis of Australian abattoir datasets (2009-2014), in combination with regional climate data, was undertaken to evaluate critical factors associated with seed contamination across southern Australia. Significant differences in seed contamination in slaughtered sheep were associated with state, region, animal sex and age. Seed contamination was also positively associated with the distribution of Bromus spp. and Hordeum spp. Mean monthly rainfall, elevation and abattoir effects were significant, as were interactions between mean monthly temperature and state, as well as elevation and year. Results suggest the need for effective management of annual grass weeds contributing to seed contamination of Australian sheep meat products, in the context of treatment efficacy and profitability associated with implementation of integrated control options.",
author = "Jane Kelly and Jane Quinn and Sharon Nielsen and Paul Weston and John Broster and Weston, {Leslie A.}",
year = "2019",
month = "3",
day = "31",
language = "English",
journal = "Weed Research",
issn = "0043-1737",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Causal factors influencing the current incidence of weed seed contamination in sheep carcasses across Australia

AU - Kelly, Jane

AU - Quinn, Jane

AU - Nielsen, Sharon

AU - Weston, Paul

AU - Broster, John

AU - Weston, Leslie A.

PY - 2019/3/31

Y1 - 2019/3/31

N2 - Grass seed contamination of sheep carcasses and skins result in significant costs to the Australian and New Zealand sheep meat value chains. Hordeum spp. (barley grass) and Bromus spp. (brome grass) are key weed species associated with carcass contamination in Australia. As the invasive range of these species now includes much of southern Australia, both species present significant challenges for the maintenance of quality standards in Australian sheep meat products sold into global markets such as Asia (China), the Middle East, the European Union and the United States. Previous examination of Australian abattoir data (2006-2012), along with recent weed distribution patterns, suggests carcass contamination is currently associated with rainfall and infestation patterns of key annual grass weeds, although it is likely a number of other factors are also contributing to incidence. A full analysis of Australian abattoir datasets (2009-2014), in combination with regional climate data, was undertaken to evaluate critical factors associated with seed contamination across southern Australia. Significant differences in seed contamination in slaughtered sheep were associated with state, region, animal sex and age. Seed contamination was also positively associated with the distribution of Bromus spp. and Hordeum spp. Mean monthly rainfall, elevation and abattoir effects were significant, as were interactions between mean monthly temperature and state, as well as elevation and year. Results suggest the need for effective management of annual grass weeds contributing to seed contamination of Australian sheep meat products, in the context of treatment efficacy and profitability associated with implementation of integrated control options.

AB - Grass seed contamination of sheep carcasses and skins result in significant costs to the Australian and New Zealand sheep meat value chains. Hordeum spp. (barley grass) and Bromus spp. (brome grass) are key weed species associated with carcass contamination in Australia. As the invasive range of these species now includes much of southern Australia, both species present significant challenges for the maintenance of quality standards in Australian sheep meat products sold into global markets such as Asia (China), the Middle East, the European Union and the United States. Previous examination of Australian abattoir data (2006-2012), along with recent weed distribution patterns, suggests carcass contamination is currently associated with rainfall and infestation patterns of key annual grass weeds, although it is likely a number of other factors are also contributing to incidence. A full analysis of Australian abattoir datasets (2009-2014), in combination with regional climate data, was undertaken to evaluate critical factors associated with seed contamination across southern Australia. Significant differences in seed contamination in slaughtered sheep were associated with state, region, animal sex and age. Seed contamination was also positively associated with the distribution of Bromus spp. and Hordeum spp. Mean monthly rainfall, elevation and abattoir effects were significant, as were interactions between mean monthly temperature and state, as well as elevation and year. Results suggest the need for effective management of annual grass weeds contributing to seed contamination of Australian sheep meat products, in the context of treatment efficacy and profitability associated with implementation of integrated control options.

M3 - Article

JO - Weed Research

JF - Weed Research

SN - 0043-1737

ER -