Challenging the discourses of loss: A continuing sense of self within the lived experience of dementia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The journey of becoming, of leaving behind previous perceptions of who we are, is common to us all, as part of our life’s narrative. Yet those of us diagnosed with dementia fear a different journey of loss of self, exacerbated by social commentary, such as, ‘She’s no longer there’. Since my diagnosis with dementia in 1995, I have published several autobiographic narratives (Bryden, 2005, 2012, 2015a, 2015b) and reflections (Bryden, 2016; Bryden & MacKinlay, 2002), as well as a literature review on counselling and psychotherapy for people with dementia, when this was a new concept (Bryden, 2002).
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)74-82
Number of pages9
JournalDementia
Volume19
Issue number1
Early online date25 Dec 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01 Jan 2020

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dementia
discourse
narrative
experience
psychotherapy
counseling
anxiety

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Challenging the discourses of loss : A continuing sense of self within the lived experience of dementia. / Bryden, Christine.

In: Dementia, Vol. 19, No. 1, 01.01.2020, p. 74-82.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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