Chemical profile differences in endemic parasitic weeds: a study of host-parasite chemical profiles in select mistletoe and eucalypt species

Research output: Book chapter/Published conference paperConference paper

8 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Summary Chemical interactions between Australian mistletoe species and their hosts are poorly understood. In this study, the chemical composition of essential oil extracted from two species of mistletoe, from multiple Eucalypt hosts, were examined. Differences in chemical profiles were found between mistletoe species. Variation in host selection incurred minimal deviation in mistletoe chemical composition. Terpenes were the major class of compounds found in each mistletoe species. Further studies into the bioactivity of these compounds are needed to elucidate their role.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication17th conference proceedings
Subtitle of host publicationNew Frontiers in New Zealand: Together we can beat the weeds
EditorsSue M Zdendos
Place of PublicationNew Zealand
PublisherNew Zealand Plant Protection Society (Inc)
Pages373-374
Number of pages2
ISBN (Electronic)9780864762399
Publication statusPublished - 2010
EventAustralasian Weeds Conference (AWC) - Christchurch, New Zealand, New Zealand
Duration: 26 Sep 201030 Sep 2010

Conference

ConferenceAustralasian Weeds Conference (AWC)
CountryNew Zealand
Period26/09/1030/09/10

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Chemical profile differences in endemic parasitic weeds: a study of host-parasite chemical profiles in select mistletoe and eucalypt species'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Preston, A., An, M., & Watson, D. (2010). Chemical profile differences in endemic parasitic weeds: a study of host-parasite chemical profiles in select mistletoe and eucalypt species. In S. M. Zdendos (Ed.), 17th conference proceedings: New Frontiers in New Zealand: Together we can beat the weeds (pp. 373-374). New Zealand Plant Protection Society (Inc).