City or the Bush? Changing patterns of Youth Outmigration 1996-2016

Research output: Other contribution to conferenceAbstract

Abstract

Traditionally in Australia there has been a perception that you outmigration is a major problem for regional centres. Youth outmigration has been linked to ageing and gender-imbalanced rural populations and to the loss of generational leadership, innovation and entrepreneurship. These factors are frequently identified as barriers to regional growth and development.
Youth outmigration has been conceptualised as the result of poor regional labour markets and limited education and training opportunities. With the growth of regional universities and online learning opportunities, there may be less pressure on young people to leave regions for educational opportunities. Concurrently, the increasing costs of housing and accommodation in capital cities has become a significant barrier for young people seeking education and training in major cities in Australia.
Drawing on ABS census data, this paper explores how patterns of youth outmigration have been evolving over the past twenty years. Using data based on local government area of residence and change in residence over the last 5 years, the paper explores the proportions of young people aged 18-24 migrating out of regional centres and those ‘staying behind’. It explores if the destinations of regional migrants have changed over time between capital cities, other regional centres or interstate destinations. Furthermore, it examines the links between rural outmigration and participation in education, employment or training, comparing the experiences of both the migratory and the residual populations.

Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2018
EventAIRAANZ Conference, Adelaide, South Australia
: 'Jobs and Change in Uncertain Times' :
- Adelaide Law School, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia
Duration: 07 Feb 201809 Feb 2018
Conference number: 32
http://www.airaanz.org/

Conference

ConferenceAIRAANZ Conference, Adelaide, South Australia
CountryAustralia
CityAdelaide
Period07/02/1809/02/18
Internet address

Fingerprint

capital city
participation in education
regional labor market
training opportunities
educational opportunity
rural population
entrepreneurship
accommodation
education
census
migrant
housing
leadership
innovation
university
gender
costs
learning
experience
time

Cite this

Bamberry, L. (2018). City or the Bush? Changing patterns of Youth Outmigration 1996-2016. Abstract from AIRAANZ Conference, Adelaide, South Australia
, Adelaide, Australia.
Bamberry, Larissa. / City or the Bush? Changing patterns of Youth Outmigration 1996-2016. Abstract from AIRAANZ Conference, Adelaide, South Australia
, Adelaide, Australia.
@conference{b97628c8b8b9410cbe110a01297d015a,
title = "City or the Bush? Changing patterns of Youth Outmigration 1996-2016",
abstract = "Traditionally in Australia there has been a perception that you outmigration is a major problem for regional centres. Youth outmigration has been linked to ageing and gender-imbalanced rural populations and to the loss of generational leadership, innovation and entrepreneurship. These factors are frequently identified as barriers to regional growth and development.Youth outmigration has been conceptualised as the result of poor regional labour markets and limited education and training opportunities. With the growth of regional universities and online learning opportunities, there may be less pressure on young people to leave regions for educational opportunities. Concurrently, the increasing costs of housing and accommodation in capital cities has become a significant barrier for young people seeking education and training in major cities in Australia. Drawing on ABS census data, this paper explores how patterns of youth outmigration have been evolving over the past twenty years. Using data based on local government area of residence and change in residence over the last 5 years, the paper explores the proportions of young people aged 18-24 migrating out of regional centres and those ‘staying behind’. It explores if the destinations of regional migrants have changed over time between capital cities, other regional centres or interstate destinations. Furthermore, it examines the links between rural outmigration and participation in education, employment or training, comparing the experiences of both the migratory and the residual populations.",
author = "Larissa Bamberry",
year = "2018",
month = "2",
language = "English",
note = "AIRAANZ Conference, Adelaide, South Australia<br/> : 'Jobs and Change in Uncertain Times' : ; Conference date: 07-02-2018 Through 09-02-2018",
url = "http://www.airaanz.org/",

}

Bamberry, L 2018, 'City or the Bush? Changing patterns of Youth Outmigration 1996-2016' AIRAANZ Conference, Adelaide, South Australia
, Adelaide, Australia, 07/02/18 - 09/02/18, .

City or the Bush? Changing patterns of Youth Outmigration 1996-2016. / Bamberry, Larissa.

2018. Abstract from AIRAANZ Conference, Adelaide, South Australia
, Adelaide, Australia.

Research output: Other contribution to conferenceAbstract

TY - CONF

T1 - City or the Bush? Changing patterns of Youth Outmigration 1996-2016

AU - Bamberry, Larissa

PY - 2018/2

Y1 - 2018/2

N2 - Traditionally in Australia there has been a perception that you outmigration is a major problem for regional centres. Youth outmigration has been linked to ageing and gender-imbalanced rural populations and to the loss of generational leadership, innovation and entrepreneurship. These factors are frequently identified as barriers to regional growth and development.Youth outmigration has been conceptualised as the result of poor regional labour markets and limited education and training opportunities. With the growth of regional universities and online learning opportunities, there may be less pressure on young people to leave regions for educational opportunities. Concurrently, the increasing costs of housing and accommodation in capital cities has become a significant barrier for young people seeking education and training in major cities in Australia. Drawing on ABS census data, this paper explores how patterns of youth outmigration have been evolving over the past twenty years. Using data based on local government area of residence and change in residence over the last 5 years, the paper explores the proportions of young people aged 18-24 migrating out of regional centres and those ‘staying behind’. It explores if the destinations of regional migrants have changed over time between capital cities, other regional centres or interstate destinations. Furthermore, it examines the links between rural outmigration and participation in education, employment or training, comparing the experiences of both the migratory and the residual populations.

AB - Traditionally in Australia there has been a perception that you outmigration is a major problem for regional centres. Youth outmigration has been linked to ageing and gender-imbalanced rural populations and to the loss of generational leadership, innovation and entrepreneurship. These factors are frequently identified as barriers to regional growth and development.Youth outmigration has been conceptualised as the result of poor regional labour markets and limited education and training opportunities. With the growth of regional universities and online learning opportunities, there may be less pressure on young people to leave regions for educational opportunities. Concurrently, the increasing costs of housing and accommodation in capital cities has become a significant barrier for young people seeking education and training in major cities in Australia. Drawing on ABS census data, this paper explores how patterns of youth outmigration have been evolving over the past twenty years. Using data based on local government area of residence and change in residence over the last 5 years, the paper explores the proportions of young people aged 18-24 migrating out of regional centres and those ‘staying behind’. It explores if the destinations of regional migrants have changed over time between capital cities, other regional centres or interstate destinations. Furthermore, it examines the links between rural outmigration and participation in education, employment or training, comparing the experiences of both the migratory and the residual populations.

UR - http://www.airaanz.org/uploads/2/1/6/3/2163987/airaanz_abstracts_2018.pdf

M3 - Abstract

ER -

Bamberry L. City or the Bush? Changing patterns of Youth Outmigration 1996-2016. 2018. Abstract from AIRAANZ Conference, Adelaide, South Australia
, Adelaide, Australia.