Les attitudes face aux changements climatiques et les actions pour la décroissance énergétique des chrétiens pratiquants: les effets des persuasions religieuses et du capital social

Translated title of the contribution: Climate change attitudes and energy descent behaviours of Australian churchgoers: The effects of religious persuasions and social capital

Rosemary Leonard, Miriam Pepper

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)
7 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

This quantitative study of the attitudes towards climate change and energy reduction actions of Australian Christian churchgoers presents data from a series of national surveys, one of which is investigated in greater depth to identify the relationship between religious persuasion and social capital on the one hand and consumer energy reduction and ‘civic’ action on the other. Comparisons are made with reference to surveys of the Australian population carried out in 2006 and 2011. Churchgoers were found to be slightly more pro-environment than the Australian population as a whole in their attitudes and actions. Social capital was a stronger predictor of action, particularly civic actions, than environmental attitudes or religious persuasions. The norm of Christian responsibility for the environment was also a strong predictor of action. Because church leaders were trusted sources of information about climate change, they played an important role in fostering positive changes in attitudes and actions.
Translated title of the contributionClimate change attitudes and energy descent behaviours of Australian churchgoers: The effects of religious persuasions and social capital
Original languageFrench
Pages (from-to)326-343
Number of pages18
JournalSocial Compass: international review of sociology of religion
Volume62
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01 Sep 2015

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Climate change attitudes and energy descent behaviours of Australian churchgoers: The effects of religious persuasions and social capital'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this