Clinical assessment of suicide risk and suicide attempters' self-reported suicide intent

A cross sectional study

Carol C. Choo, Keith M. Harris, Peter K.H. Chew, Roger C. Ho

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study explored medical doctors' clinical assessment of suicide risk and suicide attempters' self-reported suicide intent. Three years of archival assessment records related to suicide attempters who were admitted to the emergency department of a large teaching hospital in Singapore were subjected to analysis. Records related to 460 suicide attempters (70.4% females; 28.6% males) were analysed using logistic regressions. Their ages ranged from 12 to 85 (M = 29.08, SD = 12.86). The strongest predictor of suicide intent was habitual poor coping, followed by serious financial problems, and expressed regret. The strongest predictor of suicide risk was hiding the attempt followed by prior planning. The findings were discussed in regards to implications in clinical assessments and suicide prevention efforts.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0217613
Pages (from-to)1-11
Number of pages11
JournalPLoS One
Volume14
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 05 Jul 2019

Fingerprint

suicide
cross-sectional studies
Suicide
Cross-Sectional Studies
Logistics
Teaching
Planning
Singapore
physicians
Teaching Hospitals
Hospital Emergency Service
Emotions
planning
Logistic Models

Cite this

@article{24b35a2aade54bbeb33ebb7092a50a19,
title = "Clinical assessment of suicide risk and suicide attempters' self-reported suicide intent: A cross sectional study",
abstract = "This study explored medical doctors' clinical assessment of suicide risk and suicide attempters' self-reported suicide intent. Three years of archival assessment records related to suicide attempters who were admitted to the emergency department of a large teaching hospital in Singapore were subjected to analysis. Records related to 460 suicide attempters (70.4{\%} females; 28.6{\%} males) were analysed using logistic regressions. Their ages ranged from 12 to 85 (M = 29.08, SD = 12.86). The strongest predictor of suicide intent was habitual poor coping, followed by serious financial problems, and expressed regret. The strongest predictor of suicide risk was hiding the attempt followed by prior planning. The findings were discussed in regards to implications in clinical assessments and suicide prevention efforts.",
author = "Choo, {Carol C.} and Harris, {Keith M.} and Chew, {Peter K.H.} and Ho, {Roger C.}",
year = "2019",
month = "7",
day = "5",
doi = "10.1371/journal.pone.0217613",
language = "English",
volume = "14",
pages = "1--11",
journal = "PLoS One",
issn = "1932-6203",
publisher = "Public Library of Science (PLoS)",
number = "7",

}

Clinical assessment of suicide risk and suicide attempters' self-reported suicide intent : A cross sectional study. / Choo, Carol C.; Harris, Keith M.; Chew, Peter K.H.; Ho, Roger C.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 14, No. 7, e0217613, 05.07.2019, p. 1-11.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Clinical assessment of suicide risk and suicide attempters' self-reported suicide intent

T2 - A cross sectional study

AU - Choo, Carol C.

AU - Harris, Keith M.

AU - Chew, Peter K.H.

AU - Ho, Roger C.

PY - 2019/7/5

Y1 - 2019/7/5

N2 - This study explored medical doctors' clinical assessment of suicide risk and suicide attempters' self-reported suicide intent. Three years of archival assessment records related to suicide attempters who were admitted to the emergency department of a large teaching hospital in Singapore were subjected to analysis. Records related to 460 suicide attempters (70.4% females; 28.6% males) were analysed using logistic regressions. Their ages ranged from 12 to 85 (M = 29.08, SD = 12.86). The strongest predictor of suicide intent was habitual poor coping, followed by serious financial problems, and expressed regret. The strongest predictor of suicide risk was hiding the attempt followed by prior planning. The findings were discussed in regards to implications in clinical assessments and suicide prevention efforts.

AB - This study explored medical doctors' clinical assessment of suicide risk and suicide attempters' self-reported suicide intent. Three years of archival assessment records related to suicide attempters who were admitted to the emergency department of a large teaching hospital in Singapore were subjected to analysis. Records related to 460 suicide attempters (70.4% females; 28.6% males) were analysed using logistic regressions. Their ages ranged from 12 to 85 (M = 29.08, SD = 12.86). The strongest predictor of suicide intent was habitual poor coping, followed by serious financial problems, and expressed regret. The strongest predictor of suicide risk was hiding the attempt followed by prior planning. The findings were discussed in regards to implications in clinical assessments and suicide prevention efforts.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85069267325&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85069267325&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1371/journal.pone.0217613

DO - 10.1371/journal.pone.0217613

M3 - Article

VL - 14

SP - 1

EP - 11

JO - PLoS One

JF - PLoS One

SN - 1932-6203

IS - 7

M1 - e0217613

ER -