Community values for wetlands, forests and a river reach: a study of assigned values to inform regional natural resource management (NRM) decision-making

Eloise Jane Seymour

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

156 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

There have been very few studies exploring the factors influencing assigned values and tLandholders expressed the widest range of values and described tensions between economic and environmental uses, particularly for native vegetation. NRM professionals responded similarly to environmental group members.Survey data (n=292), analysed using a variety of techniques including Structural Equation Modelling, found that having strong biospheric and altruistic held values (i.e., concern based on all living things and other people) did not necessarily lead to placing high importance on environmental and social assigned values. Rather, the relationship between held values and assigned values followed an indirect path via beliefs and personal norms, in line with Value-Belief-Norm theory. While gender, environmental group membershipand length of residency were found to influence held values, they did not influence assigned values. Occupation and proximity of the valuer from the asset were associated with economic values. Most of the variation in assigned values was explained by a combination of held values, beliefs and personal norms.Environmental and social assigned values were found to be reliable predictors of behavioural intention.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
Awarding Institution
  • Charles Sturt University
Supervisors/Advisors
  • Curtis, Allan, Principal Supervisor
  • Pannell, David, Co-Supervisor, External person
  • Allan, Catherine, Co-Supervisor
  • Roberts, Anna, Co-Supervisor, External person
Award date01 Aug 2010
Place of PublicationAustralia
Publisher
Publication statusPublished - 2010

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Community values for wetlands, forests and a river reach: a study of assigned values to inform regional natural resource management (NRM) decision-making'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this