Competition between temperate perennial pasture species and annual weeds: the effect of pasture management on population dynamics and resource use

Annabel Janet Bowcher

    Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

    313 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    This research showed that annual species dominated the pasture systems insouthern NSW and that there was a low incidence of perennial species. However, although the presence of perennial species in a pasture can limit the opportunities for weed to invade, they can not be relied upon as a sole weed management solution. Rather, perennials should be used as part of a weed management strategy. Successful weed management within this ecosystem requires an understanding of how various pasture management strategies affect population dynamics and resource use and change botanical composition. This then enables a combination of options to be selected and strategically timed for maximum, cumulative effect on pasture composition.
    Original languageEnglish
    QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
    Awarding Institution
    • Charles Sturt University
    Supervisors/Advisors
    • Virgona, Jim, Co-Supervisor, External person
    • Lemerle, Deirdre, Co-Supervisor
    • Pratley, Jim, Co-Supervisor
    Award date19 Oct 2004
    Place of PublicationAustralia
    Publisher
    Publication statusPublished - 2002

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